The Ullswater Way Fund

Walking the Ullswater Way is a challenge. Just like taking care of its surrounding footpaths. The path welcomes thousands of visitors each year but the popularity comes at a cost. We need your help to maintain, protect and care for this much loved path.

The LDF Ullswater Way Fund specifically cares for the spectacular landscape, wildlife and cultural heritage surrounding England’s second largest lake.

We are running a campaign throughout April and May to generate funds ahead of the busy tourism season. You can support us by:

1. Becoming a business supporter for the Ullswater Way Fund
2. Donate via our crowdfunding campaign from 29th March!
3. Running an event? Become an event supporter here
4. Look out for our contactless donation device on the Ullswater Way

A small donation can make a big different

  • £5 helps pay for a new finger post
  • £10 helps pay for a new gate
  • £25 helps pay for a new section of surface path
  • £50 pays for one metre of drystone wall
  • £100 covers the cost of planting an acre of new native woodland
  • £200 could pay for a day’s digger time or a day’s work for a skilled contractor to carry out the repair work

What is the Ullswater Way?

The Ullswater Way, in the Lake District, was created by the local communities and partners to show the Ullswater valley was open for business after the devastating floods in 2015.

The 20 mile circular long-distance walk hugs the shores of England’s second largest lake, Ullswater, taking in the glorious landscape, wildlife and villages along the way.

The route has proved incredibility popular since launching in April 2016, with walkers, runners, day-trippers on the Ullswater Steamers and those taking part in charity challenges.

Popularity comes at a cost

The footfall is having a huge impact on the environment, causing serious footpath erosion and damage.

Urgent path maintenance work is required to reduce the impact of the busy summer season ahead. The route needs drainage works, improvements to the path surface, new drystone walling, waymarker signs and help to maintain the general upkeep to ensure the path is litter free.

The money raised through this appeal will be used for this work to be carried out by the Lake District National Park ranger team and volunteers.

Make a donation today on our crowdfunding campaign here.

The LDF Fund

The Lake District Foundation Fund provides grants to projects that care for the spectacular landscapes, wildlife and cultural heritage of the Lake District and Cumbria.

When you make a donation to the Lake District Foundation you are supporting high-impact evidence-based projects that are of urgent priority.

Funding decisions are made by a grant-making panel. We are open to creative and innovative ideas that have a measurable and sustainable impact. We are particularly keen to support projects that link to our World Heritage Inscription.

Some recently funded projects from the LDF Fund include:

For a full list of recently funded projects take a look here, or to apply for a grant, click here.

Fix the Fells

Fix the Fells is a partnership programme between the Lake District National Park, National Trust, Natural England, Lake District Foundation, Friends of the Lake District and Cumbria County Council to repair erosion scars which have developed over the years, and to make sure that these scars are prevented in the future.

The Lake District fells are enjoyed by millions of walkers every year but the high level paths can be surprisingly fragile and the sheer number of visitors leave a mark on the landscape. Over time grass is compacted by heavy foot traffic and dies. Heavy rainfall quickly washes away the exposed soil down the steep slopes into streams, rivers and eventually the lakes, where the increased amount of silt causes havoc for fish and other species.

The work being done aims to prevent this loss of grass and soil by designing and creating paths that are resilient to wear and tear and reduce the impact on the surrounding landscape. On steep slopes you may see ‘pitching’ where stone has been laid, while on less steep slopes the paths may have been repaired by a ‘soil inversion’ technique with the aid of a digger.

Take a look at what the teams have been up to recently:

  

 

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