Having a pre-Christmas clearout? Donate your old notes to the Lake District Foundation

Are you having a pre-Christmas clear out? Have you found any old five or ten pound notes and are wondering what to do with them?

The Bank of England estimates that around 124 million paper £5 notes and around 122 million paper £10 notes are yet to be returned, despite the paper £5 no longer being accepted in shops since May 2017, and the paper £10 since March this year.

And while you can’t use them in shops, they retain their value for all time, so why not donate them to the Lake District Foundation?

Simply send your old notes either by post to the Lake District Foundation, Murley Moss Business Park, Oxehnholme Road, Kendal, LA9 7RL, or visit us in person , simply come to the reception desk at the visitors entrance to the Lake District National Park Authority Headquarters at the address above,  Mon – Fri 9am – 4pm.

Alternatively, you can send your old notes to the Bank of England or exchange them at the bank where you are a current customer.

Local business supporters enjoy a festive lunch

The Lake District Foundation annual Christmas Lunch at the Stove Restaurant at The Langdale Estate was a great success, and was attended by 30 local business members.

Attendees were treated to a presentation by the Lake District Foundation’s newest ambassador Kate Rawles. Kate presented about the her latest trip to South America on a bamboo bike where she saw the effects of climate change on biodiversity.

They also heard from a recent recipient of a Lake District Foundation grant – The John Muir Trust. Pete Barron talked about the progress at the Lakeland Alpine Arctic Restoration Project, mitigating the impacts of climate change at a local level.

Finally they were treated to a talk by James Forrest, fundraiser at the Lake District Foundation, who this year climbed all 273 mountains in Ireland in 8 weeks!

We would like to wish all our business supporters a very merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Here’s to a fantastic 2019!

Spread festive cheer and care for the Lake District too

You can now spread some festive cheer, save paper, and care for the Lake District too with JustGiving Give Cards.

Simply make a donation to the Lake District Foundation and get an e-card in minutes to share with your family and friends.

How it works:

  1. Follow the link: www.justgiving.com/givecards/charity/uk/2452743
  2. Choose your favourite design (we like the skating penguins!)
  3. Make a donation
  4. Share it with your friends and family!

Thank you and merry Christmas!

 

 

Full steam ahead for the reconnection of the Keswick to Threlkeld Railway Path as funding is announced

Press release 
5 December 2018

A £7.9 million funding package has been agreed to allow work to start on the final phase of reconnecting the Keswick to Threlkeld multi user trail which was severely damaged in Storm Desmond three years ago to the day (5 December).

Today is an important milestone in this complex project which has required significant work to get to this stage, and it is fitting that key funding partners and local users gathered to mark this development exactly three years since the fateful storm.

Funding has been approved so far from Highways England and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). Additionally, community fundraising by the Lake District Foundation has resulted in a £130,000 donation all which will enable the project to go ahead.

Richard Leafe, Chief Executive of Lake District National Park said: “Storm Desmond caused unprecedented amounts of damage to communities, trails and bridges across the national park. This particular trail offers a great family-friendly, traffic-free route from town to village, it will be fully accessible to many people, such as cyclists, walkers and runners. It has taken some time but we have always been fully committed to making sure that it is reconnected for the benefit of all.

“Local fundraising has played a huge part in ensuring that this project can go ahead, demonstrating the strength of public feeling about this important trail. We’re thrilled that we now have the money in place to allow work to go ahead to complete the full reconnection of the Keswick to Threlkeld trail and make the route more resilient along the way.”

Construction contracts are currently out to tender and the trail construction partners will be announced in the near future. The aim is to start work in the New Year and have the route fully reopened within two years.

Highways England has committed a significant portion of the funding to allow this project to progress.

Bruce Parker, Highways England’s head of planning and development for the North West, said: “We’re delighted to be able to provide almost half the £7.9 million needed to restore and enhance the link between Keswick and Threlkeld, which was so badly damaged in Storm Desmond exactly three years ago and are looking forward to the re-construction work getting underway in the New Year.

“Highways England has set aside £250 million for projects like this focusing on supporting pedestrian, cyclist and equestrian users of the road network.  This money along with other special funds – for example supporting growth and housing and environmental improvements – is enabling us to provide environmental, social and economic benefits to the people, communities and businesses who live and work alongside our strategic road network.”

Sarah Swindley, CEO, Lake District Foundation said: “We ran a fundraising initiative this year and were completely blown away by the generosity of the local community and visitors to the area. We look forward to seeing the work start and progress over the next two years.”

During Storm Desmond, on 5 December 2015, two bridges that cross the River Greta and around 200 metres of path were completely washed away during the worst floods the county has seen and Rawsome Bridge was also later closed to ensure public safety.

Since then, the Lake District National Park has been working with key partners from the public and voluntary sectors on a plan to fully reconnect the route. As part of this work, a value for money study was undertaken and concluded that the restoration of the route could bring back about £2 million a year to the local economy.

This next phase will ensure the entire route will be reconnected and can once again be enjoyed by the local community and visitors to the area.

Photo shows key partners gathered at Brundholme where work will start along with some of the locals who are looking forward to the trail being reconnected.

L- R Richard Leafe LDNPA, Jonathan Reade, Highways England, Sarah Swindley, Lake District Foundation, Brittany Mason from ERDF and Amos Doran, Keswick Bikes.

Find out more information on www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/keswickrailway

Our record-breaking ambassador Sean Conway offers a rare glimpse into his worldwide adventures

From a record-breaking cycle across Europe, to three separate adventures running, sailing and swimming the length of Great Britain, our ambassador Sean Conway is set to reveal more about his escapades to members of the public in the new year.

The Cumbrian-based action man has spent his life taking motivation from conquering seemingly impossible challenges – only to use the success in each escapade as a warm-up for the next item on his ‘to-do’ list.

You could be forgiven for thinking a 4,200-mile triathlon around the coast of Great Britain and cycling to the Alps to save the cost of a plane ticket is how Sean gets his biggest kicks, but there’s more – and it’s not what you might expect.

Sean loves nothing more than to inspire others with his tales of adventure and is holding a special lecture on Saturday January 19 as part of his “Explore from the Door” project with the Coniston-based Coppermines Lakes Cottages company.

“The idea behind ‘Explore from the Door’ is to remind people of the fun they can have so close to home”, Sean explained. “We all had our early adventures near our homes when we were children and I hope my series of blogs inspire people to venture a little bit further out into this beautiful part of the world”.

Hear Sean’s story on Saturday 19th January 2019, 8pm, at Coniston Sports and Social Club.

Tickets available for purchase from Coniston Newsagents, Hidden Treasures Gift Shop, or alternatively email rebecca@coppermines.co.uk. All proceeds from ticket sales will be donated to the Lake District Foundation.

“We’ve all got to remember that when we’re outside, we’re in nature’s kingdom, not our own. The Lake District Foundation is very much aimed at visitors and the tourism industry, who can help us to protect that kingdom. The charity’s approach to caring for the lakes is exactly as it should be; come here to visit – and if you like it, donate some money to help care for it. It means the next time you come here, it will still be just as amazing as you remember it.

“It’s great how local businesses like Coppermines Lakes Cottages appreciate the importance of the different projects that the LDF is involved with; and how without the generosity of people giving whatever they can afford, it would be impossible to preserve this place in the way it has been for so many years. Every child remembers their early outdoor experiences with family or friends and I hope they use those to set their own goals in the future, like I’ve done for so many years. Who knows, maybe one day I’ll be handing over my world records to them!”

Meanwhile, the team at Coppermines Lakes Cottages is running a competition for four lucky people to win an adventure weekend to coincide with Sean’s talk. The prize includes a three-night stay at Millrace Cottage (from Friday 18 January 2019), four tickets to Sean’s show, an adventure day courtesy of Adventure 21 and four signed copies of Sean’s book collection (Cycling Land’s End to John O’Groats, Hell & High Water, Cycling the Earth and Running Britain). You can enter the competition here.

You can see the full list of Coppermines Lakes Cottages here.

See you there!

Alastair Herd Photography supports the Lake District Foundation

Alastair Herd Photography is one of the latest businesses to support the Lake District Foundation (LDF) by raising funds and awareness for this local charity.

The owner and founder, Alastair Herd, says; “Working with the Lake District Foundation is an exciting and promising collaboration. We can’t wait to sell our prints and know that we are doing our bit to help protect and preserve the Lake District, the beautiful world heritage site we call our own. With this collaboration we will also be documenting some of the many fantastic projects that are happening across the Lake District and be able to showcase these projects to the general public.”

After recently graduating from Staffordshire University with a First in BA(Hons) Photography, Alastair has moved back up to his hometown of Carlisle to pursue his passion of photography and technology. In September 2017 Alastair gained the PfCO (Permission of Commercial Operation) that is required by the CAA (Civil Aviation Authority) to do any commercial Drone work, and has been capturing stunning aerial footage for a wide range of clients.

Alastair has already donated images for the LDF to use in their marketing materials, some were recently used in a photo competition on their stand at Holker Hall Winter Market, where over 100 people took part.

If you would like to see Alastair’s work for yourself, he will be at the Eden Valley Artist Network Event at Rheged on 8th December 2018, and 10% from all sales of Crystal clear plexiglas photo prints on the day will be donated to the LDF Fund. He is also donating 10% of sales of the Plexiglas prints on his website, available to buy here: www.alastairherdphotography.co.uk/shop

Finally the LDF will soon be collaborating with Alastair Herd to produce films that capture the impact of the grants made to local projects – watch this space!

Sarah Swindley, Director of the Lake District Foundation says; “We are delighted to be working with the fantastic local photographer Alastair Herd and we are grateful for his time and energy that will help us to raise our profile and reach new audiences. The funds raised by the sale of his products will be used to support projects that care for outstanding and effective projects that care for the Lake District and Cumbria”.

If you are inspired to support the Lake District Foundation in your business, please get in touch via email info@lakedistrictfoundation.org or call us on 01539 822622.

Lake District Foundation welcomes new ambassador

The Lake District Foundation is delighted to welcome its newest ambassador: Dr Kate Rawles.

Kate is passionate about using adventurous journeys to raise awareness and inspire action on our major environmental challenges. She has recently returned from The Life Cycle: Colombia to Cape Horn by bamboo bike, exploring biodiversity loss.

A former lecturer in environmental philosophy, and in Outdoor Studies at the University of Cumbria in Ambleside, Kate set up Outdoor Philosophy to explore big questions about human/nature relations in nature rather than lecture theatres.

In 2006, she cycled from Texas to Alaska along the spine of the Rockies exploring climate change. Her book about this journey, The Carbon Cycle; Crossing the Great Divide, was shortlisted for the Banff Mountain Festival Adventure Travel Award, 2012. Other ‘adventure plus’ journeys include the Gyre to Gaia ocean plastic pollution sailing voyage with Pangaea Exploration.

Lake District Foundation CEO, Sarah Swindley, says “We are delighted to welcome Kate Rawles as an ambassador for the Lake District Foundation. Her passion for communication and adventures in the great outdoors are a perfect fit for our cause, and we hope that this partnership will inspire many more people to care for our spectacular wildlife and landscapes.”

Kate joins existing ambassador Sean Conway, who has been supporting this charity since it was founded in 2017.

You can find out more about our ambassadors, here.

 

Managing the biodiversity of the Lake District National Park

The Lake District Foundation has awarded a grant of £4,500 to the Cumbria Local Nature Partnership, enabling them to lead the development of a clear, strategic approach for managing the biodiversity of the Lake District National Park.

Local Nature Partnerships have been established to drive positive change in the local natural environment.  This funding will enable them to consider the broad picture across Cumbria, pooling knowledge and indentifying any gaps and challenges.  We will then be able to ensure that future funding is invested in the best possible places and projects, with the right people involved to deliver measurable benefits for wildlife, people and the economy.

We look forward to the development of this strategy, which will help us all ensure that we care for and protect the landscapes, wildlife and cultural heritage of the English Lake District in the best possible way.

Helping to save Helvellyn’s vulnerable arctic alpine flora

The Lake District Foundation has awarded a grant of over £2,600 to the John Muir Trust, which last year took over responsibility for the management of a large part of the iconic Lake District mountain, Helvellyn.  The money will fund a new project aiming to increase the populations of threatened arctic-alpine species found on the high crags of the Helvellyn range.

The project will bring together national experts, local volunteers and staff of the John Muir Trust in a project to safeguard our nationally important but extremely vulnerable populations of Arctic alpine flora.  Many of these species are growing at the southern edge of their range on Helvellyn.  The project hopes to see the successful re-introduction of species lost or under threat due to people and erosion pressure.  The work will also help to ‘future-proof’ upland floral and shrub populations against the threat of climate change.  Alpine mouse ear, Alpine cinquefoil and purple saxifrage are amongst the species that, it is hoped, will benefit from a gradual increase in their population size.

Beginning in the autumn/winter months of 2018, the project will start with the close monitoring of the arctic alpine species present and the collection of seed and cuttings.  Volunteers from the local community in Patterdale will work with staff from the John Muir Trust to propagate and ‘grow-on’ a stock of young plants.  Specialist advice will be available from Natural England and volunteer growers will help assess the success and failure of propagation of these rare species to help inform future work.  The funding from the Lake District Foundation will cover the costs of the special growing medium, pots and tools needed, and will contribute towards the costs of seed and cuttings collection, volunteer training and transport.

Hopefully – and with the enthusiastic support of Patterdale’s volunteer horticulturalists – the first successful shrub cuttings will be ready to plant out by autumn 2019.  The more adventurous and athletic volunteers may even get the opportunity to climb the high crags of Helvellyn to help planting out back onto the fells.  But the whole community and visitors to this upland landscape will benefit if this ground-breaking project is successful in creating more robust populations of the endangered arctic alpine species found in this tough Lakeland habitat.

Lake District Foundation launches regular giving appeal

Lake District Foundation launches regular giving appeal

The Lake District Foundation (LDF) has launched a new campaign to boost the number of people who give to the charity on a regular basis.

By donating as little as £2.50 per month, those who sign up to become a regular supporter will directly contribute to funding vital projects aimed at caring for the Lake District and Cumbria’s natural environment and cultural heritage.

Recent examples of projects include fundraising to fix the paths on England’s highest mountain, Scafell Pike, the Haweswater Woodland project – where volunteers will plant 400 protected native trees on a carefully selected area of Mardale Common and earlier this year a fundraising campaign generate funds to support the reconnection of the old Keswick to Threlkeld Railway Path which was washed away by Storm Desmond in 2015.

Regular supporters will be directly supporting high-impact and evidence-based projects on the ground, ensuring the sustainability of our spectacular landscape, wildlife and cultural heritage.

Lake District Foundation Director Sarah Swindley says, “Regular income is of enormous benefit to charities, especially so for the Lake District Foundation. The money raised will enable our team to help fund projects that share our goals much more effectively. Forward planning is so important and having a regular income stream helps us to plan even further ahead. It doesn’t have to be a huge amount of money if people choose to donate. Any amount, no matter how big or small, is welcome. It all adds-up to help us look after this spectacular landscape, wildlife and cultural heritage for future generations to enjoy.”

As a token of gratitude to those who show their regular support, donors will be sent a

welcome pack including a Lake District Foundation tote bag, window sticker, as well as limited edition pin and woven patch badge – the latter of which has been produced by Keswick-based family business, Conquer Lake District.

The regular giving campaign was launched at the weekend’s Holker Hall Winter Market, where the team was joined by University of Cumbria volunteer students from the Ambleside campus, as well as the team from Lake District Pound (LD£).

You can sign-up by telephoning 01539 822 622, 9am-5pm on weekdays, download a paper form from the LDF website. Alternatively, people can sign up face to face at the Kendal Mountain Festival (November 15-18) or the Keswick Victorian Christmas Market (December 2). As an extra bonus, the first 100 people to sign-up will be entered into a free prize draw for a fell runner Jos Naylor-signed LD£ book.

‘Cultural Heritage’ within the Lake District World Heritage Site – Join the discussion

The Lake District’s World Heritage Site inscription includes its Cultural Heritage – but what does that mean?  If you live or work in or close to the Lake District, you will now have an opportunity to join in the discussion to help define and manage this special characteristic of the area.

The Lake District Foundation has awarded £4,500 for a series of community workshops to be held throughout Cumbria and the Lake District to help residents understand and take ownership of the Cultural Heritage of the Lake District World Heritage Site.

A pilot event held in May 2018 clearly demonstrated that there is currently a lack of understanding about World Heritage Status and what it might mean for local communities in the Lake District.  Equally important is the impact on communities on the periphery of the designated World Heritage Site.  Participants at the pilot workshop were keen to establish on-going dialogue so that local representatives share in the development of both identity and vision for the World Heritage Site.

Thanks to the funding from the Lake District Foundation, community development organisation ACTion with Communities in Cumbria (ACT) is now able to arrange a series of local engagement workshops.  These will enable residents to explore the benefits, opportunities and challenges presented by the Lake District’s World Heritage Status.  They will give local people an opportunity to help define the identity, protection and management of their cultural heritage.  Residents and community representatives from across the county will have an opportunity to attend workshops in Bootle, Broughton-in-Furness, Keswick, Glenridding and Grasmere.  The events will focus on listening to community views and exploring with them ways to work with the Lake District National Park Partnership (the body responsible for World Heritage Status inscription) to celebrate their cultural heritage and conserve the natural environment.

Tree planting at Mardale Common, Haweswater

The Lake District Foundation has awarded a grant of over £2,000 to the Royal Society for the protection of Birds (RSPB) for tree planting at its Haweswater Nature Reserve at Bampton, near Penrith.  Commencing in November 2018, the project will see 400 trees planted on Mardale Common over the coming two winters.  The new planting will enhance the resilience of the existing ancient woodland, which is vulnerable as trees become older and less able to withstand the spread of disease and the effects of climate change.

This valuable contribution will enable the RSPB to train and equip their active team of local volunteers to plant the saplings, sourced from their own Haweswater tree nursery, to create an area of new woodland on Mardale Common.  The trees will be surrounded with weldmesh protection, nurturing their survival into mature trees.  Planted at low density, the new trees will become the large open-grown landscape trees for future generations.  Currently, these large landscape trees are being lost in Cumbria at a faster rate than they are being replaced, and the Lake District World Heritage Site nomination highlighted the vulnerability of our ageing native tree population and the need for new planting in appropriate places.

The RSPB has extensive experience of tree planting at Haweswater, having managed the area in collaboration with the landowner, United Utilities, for over 40 years.  The project has been developed in consultation with the Woodland Trust, the National Trust and United Utilities to provide a co-ordinated response to the challenges.

The local community welcomes this important project, recognising the importance of woodlands in providing habitat to support a broad range of wildlife, as well as being concerned about the impact on the landscape caused by the loss of ancient trees.  The RSPB already has extensive experience of tree planting at Haweswater, where previous planting work has resulted in an increase in biodiversity, with gains recorded for species including red squirrels, tree pipits and whinchats.  Mardale Common is all designated public access land, and the new area of woodland can be reached using a number of public footpaths that pass nearby.

Whilst the RSPB is hugely grateful to the Lake District Foundation’s supporters whose donations have made this funding possible, they are indebted to their team of around 20 local volunteers who are committed to conserving the wildlife and landscape on their doorstep.  The group is open to all ages and abilities and is always actively seeking new members to join its weekly work parties.

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