fbpx
Loading....

Lakes Distillery makes splash with six water projects

Six community projects have received a funding splash to help them look after lakes and rivers across Cumbria.

The Lake District Foundation joined forces with The Lakes Distillery to launch a £25k funding pot for projects that enhance and conserve water quality.

Six projects across the county have now been selected to receive funding from The Lakes Distillery Water Fund.

Lake District Diving will get funding

Sarah Smith, Lake District Foundation Operations Manager, said: “We are delighted to partner with The Lakes Distillery to support six fantastic community-led projects in the Lake District. Each are different but are all designed to make a lasting improvements to water quality in our rivers and lakes.”

Nigel Mills, co-founder and CEO at The Lakes Distillery, said: “It is fantastic that we have an opportunity to support these community projects and to help them deliver against what are very important environmental aims.

“We look forward to seeing the projects get underway and our team at the distillery is also very excited to get directly involved by volunteering and helping to deliver some of these schemes.”

Clean River Kent Campaign will get funding

Isobel Stoddart is chair at The Clean River Kent Campaign which has been awarded £3250 from the fund.

She said: “We are delighted to receive funding to continue our volunteer monitoring work to help protect and preserve the ecology of the River Kent, as well as those that enjoy using it.

“This funding will enable us to get a much deeper understanding of the water quality along the length of our precious river.”

West Cumbria Rivers Trust

The Lakes Distillery Water Fund is one of several initiatives taking place this year across Cumbria to look after lakes and rivers.

Projects supported by Lakes Distillery Fund:

Organisation: Cumbria Wildlife Trust

Project: Habitat restoration at Eycott Hill Nature Reserve

Funding: £5000

Description: The work will involve reducing soil erosion, improving water quality, enhancing biodiversity, creating habitats and slowing water flow into Naddles Beck protecting communities, streams, rivers and lakes further downstream.

Organisation: Lake District Diving

Project: Cleaning Up Litter Hidden in our Lakes and Rivers

Funding: £2000

Description: Working with community and volunteers to remove litter from lakes and rivers in the Lake District. Working mainly at Windermere but also Rydal, Grasmere, Derwentwater, Ullswater, River Kent, and mountain tarns.

Organisation: Spring to Sea

Project: The Becks of Ullswater – tackling micro plastic pollution

Funding: £4750

Description: Spring To Sea is a community interest group. It intends to clean any plastic pollution from the becks running into Ullswater with the help of local volunteers.

Organisation: Sustainability and Energy Network, Staveley

Project: Clean River Kent Campaign

Funding: £3250

Description: A community coalition from Staveley, Burneside and Kendal will apply for bathing water designation for two River Kent sites, to protect water-based recreational users from sewage health hazards and bring wildlife benefits.

Organisation: Lake District National Park Authority

Project: Bassenthwaite for all

Funding: £5000

Description: To support a two-year project focusing on Bassenthwaite Lake. Habitat management – willow coppicing and improving the lakeshore habitats, establishing a new volunteer group, working with new and existing audiences to raise awareness of biosecurity measures, holding litter picks.

Organisation: West Cumbria Rivers Trust

Project: Data for the Derwent

Funding: £5000

Project: Himalayan Balsam removal and fish surveys that inform future conservation work.

Let’s love lake Windermere

A week-long fundraiser to help care for Windermere is launched today (Friday 22 April).

The Lake District Foundation is taking part in the Big Give’s Green Match Fund – a nationwide fundraising drive which launches on Earth Day and runs until 29 April.

The Big Give raises money for environmental campaigns across the country which tackle climate change, protect species, eliminate waste and improve sustainability.

In Cumbria the Lake District Foundation wants to raise funds to deliver a range of community activities which care for Windermere. Donations will be match-funded to the tune of £10k.

Windermere is England’s largest lake. It is a nationally important place for wildlife and is also a valued space for recreation, relaxation and well-being attracting thousands of visitors each year.

Sarah Swindley, Chief Executive Lake District Foundation said: “We are delighted to take part in this week-long fundraising push. All donations during the Big Give will be doubled so it’s a fantastic opportunity to raise significant funds.

“Windermere is a much-loved and iconic part of the Lake District. We want to raise as much as we can during this week of activity and then distribute monies to community projects which look after and enhance this beautiful place.”

People can support the Big Give from 22-29 April.

The donation link goes live from noon on 22 April.

Warning over carbon monoxide danger

As Easter approaches visitors to Cumbria are reminded of the dangers of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning.

The Lake District Foundation has sent safety posters to campsites as Cumbria prepares to welcome visitors.

You can’t see CO, taste it or smell it, but it can kill.

A key piece of advice is to never take a barbecue into a tent, awning, caravan or motor home. Even a cooling barbecue gives off poisonous carbon monoxide. Don’t cook inside your tent or awning. Always have gas appliances in your caravan or motor home serviced regularly.

There are around 60 deaths from accidental CO poisoning in England and Wales every year. Around 200 people are left seriously ill, while 4,000 people are treated in hospital.

A web page gives useful – and potentially life-saving – advice to campers and boaters: https://www.lakedistrictfoundation.org/carbon-monoxide/

Sarah Smith, from The Lake District Foundation said: “The Lake District and Cumbria is a haven for camping and boating, and it is great to get out into nature. But it’s important to know about CO poisoning and how to prevent it.

“As the country recovers from the pandemic we will see a significant increase in the number of first-time visitors to the Lake District National Park and visitors who may be new to camping.

“They may not be aware of the risks of CO, which could have devastating effects on individuals but also local communities and businesses. Learn how to keep you and your family safe by following the guidance on our website.”

The Lake District Foundation works with gas distributor Northern Gas Networks (NGN) to raise awareness of the dangers of CO.  NGN provides the region’s rapid response team when a smell of gas is reported or carbon monoxide is suspected.

Steve Dacre, CO Innovations Lead for NGN said: “CO cannot be seen, smelled, tasted or heard but it can be deadly. We’d advise anyone thinking of camping or caravanning this Easter holiday to pack an audible carbon monoxide alarm in their bag. They only cost £15 but could save your life.

“If you suspect carbon monoxide is present, or you smell gas, get into the fresh air immediately and call the National Gas Emergency Service straight away on 0800 111 999 and we can send an engineer out to you. This line is in operation 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”

“We are morally bound to preserve this way of life”

The Lake District Foundation has joined forces with The Lakes Distillery to launch a £25k funding pot for projects that enhance and conserve water quality.

The Lakes Distillery Water Fund is designed to support community and volunteer-led groups in their efforts to deliver water quality projects.

As the deadline for applications fast approaches (21 March 2022) we speak to Lakes Distillery co-founder and CEO Nigel Mills about the fund and why his company is so passionate about water quality…

Nigel Mills

How excited are you to launch The Lakes Distillery Water fund?

We are delighted to work with the Lake District Foundation on a fund which is designed to improve water quality in this wonderful part of the world.

We are really looking forward to receiving applications from community groups who have a passion for improving water quality throughout the Lake District National Park.

Why was The Lakes Distillery so keen to launch the Water Fund?

As a business nestled on the shore of Bassenthwaite Lake, our sense of responsibility is long-standing, but we didn’t think that trying to do good within the distillery alone was nearly enough.

We believe that the smartest way to drive positive change is by coming together and working in partnership where there is a common goal.

That is why we have joined forces with The Lake District Foundation to launch a collaboration we hope will have an impact for years to come. And we are excited to be able to support the fantastic work Sarah and the team at The Foundation do to protect and care for our National Park.

Why is The Lake Distillery so passionate about water quality?

All distilleries have a creation story, that moment of inspiration when someone decides they need to make whisky.

When that happens, there are three fundamental things they will need to succeed: lots of cold, clean water, space for storing whisky casks, and easy access to the market.

The Lake District has all of these in abundance and provides a beautiful and serene environment where creativity can flourish.

With our home rooted here, we are not only passionate about helping to protect it, but are morally bound to do all we can to preserve this way of life, including the quality of our rivers and lakes.

What kinds of water projects would you like to support?

We are in the early stages of this process in that we have asked for applications and are still waiting to see the requests. The most apparent thing for us is that we want to see projects driven by a desire to improve the water quality of our lakes and rivers.

How creative people are with the brief is up to them. We are set to look at applications at the end of March and can’t wait to see what great ideas the people of Cumbria come up with.

And your staff will also be getting involved?

The Lakes Distillery Water Fund has been made possible by the fundraising efforts of people from all areas of our business. The commitment is already company-wide, and I know the team are delighted that they are going to get the chance to be involved in supporting the successful projects first-hand.

We want to encourage positive change and so it goes beyond simply offering financial support to water improvement projects; we also want to play an active role in delivering them.

That is why each one of our team has been granted the opportunity to donate some of their time to support community and volunteer-led groups in their efforts to deliver these water quality schemes.

What would you say to community groups considering applying?

If you are considering applying for the Water Fund, we’d recommend you get moving with your application as the deadline of 21 March is fast approaching and we can’t wait to try and help you.

Apply here:

Lakes Distillery Water Fund must be received by 5pm Monday 22 March.

Funding boost to cut carbon in Cumbria

Community groups and businesses wishing to reduce their carbon footprint can apply for funding.

Low Carbon Lake District Grants is now open with another £200k available for projects which are designed to cut carbon. 

The Lake District Foundation is delighted to offer grants to community groups and small to medium sized businesses thanks to support from the European Regional Development Fund.

Two rounds of funding have already seen grants allocated to projects across Cumbria.

These include solar panels and energy saving lighting at businesses, food waste composters at hotels, and new eco refrigerators at village shops.

Sarah Smith, from The Lake District Foundation said: “We are delighted to offer this third round of funding for a scheme which is already making real progress in cutting carbon in Cumbria.

“We would invite community groups and small to medium sized businesses from a range of sectors who are keen to cut carbon to register now. This is your chance to make a difference to the sustainability of Cumbria, to create a greener future.”

Applications will be reviewed by an independent expert panel. Businesses will need to operate within Cumbria.

One business which has benefited already is Embleton Spa Hotel in north Cumbria which has been supported to get a new food waste composter.

The hotel is now able to compost all its food waste – stopping it from going to landfill – and creating compost.

Cool at composting – Embleton Spa Hotel

Ali Dixon from Embleton Spa Hotel (pictured above) said: “We’d like to thank The Lake District Foundation and their partners for the grant funding they have provided to enable this project. Initiatives like this are of vital importance in making the significant changes required to combat climate change.

More details and to apply here: Low Carbon Lake District Grants – Lake District Foundation

The Low Carbon Lake District initiative is a comprehensive programme to help tackle climate change in the National Park, working in partnership with local businesses and communities to reduce greenhouse gases and prepare for the impacts of climate change.

Led by the Lake District National Park Authority, other key partners include the Lake District Foundation, the National Trust, South Lakeland District Council and Cumbria Tourism.

Hedge heroes add to bio-diversity in Braithwaite

Braithwaite Institute has planted 80m of native hedgerow thanks to a £1,600 grant from The Lake District Foundation.

It applied to our Real Hedge Fund which gives funding to projects which help replace lost hedges and trees.

Peter Walter, Braithwaite Institute Chair of the Trustees, said.“We are lucky enough to have a huge site that hosts a cricket pitch, football pitch, tennis courts and bowling green, and we were keen to make our land as nature friendly as possible.

“This grant from the Real Hedge Fund has meant we can create a hedgerow full of nature friendly, native bushes and trees that we hope will add to the bio-diversity of our land. The hedgerow will also provide screening between our large car-park and sports fields.”

Tom Dutson and his team from Heartwood Enterprises planted the hedgerow.

Sarah Swindley, Chief Executive Lake District Foundation said: “We are delighted to support this important project. Hedges are wonderful things – they connect habitats, improve biodiversity, store carbon, and help prevent flooding.”

“Cumbria has been hit very badly this winter with severe storms which has seen thousands of trees and hedges destroyed. This makes planting projects like the one at Braithwaite even more important. The Foundation is committed to raising funds to help restore Cumbria’s lost trees.”

The Lake District Foundation’s Real Hedge Fund – which helps create and restore Cumbria’s hedgerows – has turned its focus to planting new trees and hedges lost in recent winter storms.

The charity will match-fund donations up to £5000. Every £25 donated by individuals or businesses will help create one metre of bio-diverse hedgerow or up to five saplings for replanting.

Donate to the Real Hedge Fund.

First seeds planted as eco-community grows

The first seeds have been planted on a unique green scheme in north Kendal.

Families have clubbed together to buy the derelict Holme House Farm in Skelsmergh and will create an eco-community of five homes.

They will minimise environmental impact while restoring and enhancing wildlife and habitats of the woodland, river and meadows on the plot.

The Lake District Foundation has funded the new hedgerow through the Real Hedge Fund. 

Families came together recently to plant eight oak trees – representing the community putting firm foundations down for future generations.

Over time it’s hoped the hedge will provide shelter, habitat, food and nesting sites for all manner of plants, insects, animals and birds. This will help local wildlife flourish and become more resilient.

People will also be able to harvest berries, hips and nuts for their larders, wine and jam making.

Chris Loynes from Holme House Farm said: “The funding has made it possible for us to buy native edible hedge plants and standards to create a boundary hedge, especially along the edge that we share with a public footpath.

“It is so helpful to get local funding and support for our plans to restore and enhance wildlife on Holme House Farm by planting this hedge. It has become a focal point for the community members and our friends and neighbours to get to know the place and each other.

“We hope walkers will, in time, be able to take advantage of the edible hedge as well as ourselves and wildlife.”

The Lake District Foundation’s Real Hedge Fund – which helps create and restore Cumbria’s hedgerows – has turned its focus to planting new trees and hedges lost in November’s Storm Arwen. 

The charity will match-fund donations up to £5000. Every £25 donated by individuals or businesses will help create one metre of bio-diverse hedgerow or up to five saplings for replanting.

Donate to the Real Hedge Fund

 

Historic house cuts carbon thanks to grant

The amazing Rookhow Quaker Meeting House in the Rusland Valley is almost 300-years-old and is being brought back to its former glory.

The Grade II* listed building secured around £15,550 from the Low Carbon Lake District Grants Scheme to install an air source heat pump (ASHP).

The Lake District Foundation was delighted to support this as it will improve comfort levels in the building, protect its fabric and reduce carbon footprint.

Rookhow’s redevelopment has been made possible by several trusts and individuals who have funded this fantastic project.

We visited recently to check on developments with Sue Nicholls, Rookhow Development Manager.

From May 2022 Rookhow will be open to the public on first and third Friday of every month 10am-4pm. For more info contact Sue at Rookhow: [email protected].

“Woodlands should be treasured by all” – meet graduate forester Bryce

Cumbria has a new kid on the block taking his first steps in forestry employment.

Bryce Flannaghan is a new graduate forester employed by the Lake District Foundation and managed by Cumbria Woodlands.

As part of his learning Bryce will work alongside United Utilities staff making lasting improvements to woodlands in Thirlmere. We caught-up with Bryce to find out more.

Bryce at Thirlmere. Photo Ewen Turner/Cumbria Woodlands.

Tell us about your role 

My role was created as part of a partnership between Cumbria Woodlands, United Utilities and the Lake District Foundation, who secured Green Recovery Challenge Funding generously provided by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

This will finance the restoration of plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites (PAWS) to their former natural condition throughout Thirlmere Valley. This will increase overall biodiversity, mitigate the effects of extreme weather events and climate change, as well as improving the water quality of Thirlmere reservoir, which supplies water throughout the Northwest.

My responsibility is the planning and implementation of this woodland restoration and I hope to improve and protect these unique habitats so future generations can benefit from them.

Thirlmere. Photo Ewen Turner / Cumbria Woodlands.

How pleased are you to start as graduate forester?

The forest industry is full of passionate and knowledgeable individuals, which makes for very strong competition when seeking employment as a graduate with little experience.

There are few apprenticeship schemes or graduate places that will allow someone who is new to the industry to develop their skills and connect with professionals and I was very lucky to have secured one with Cumbria Woodlands.

They, in partnership with United Utilities and the Lake District Foundation have supported me in my transition from education to full-time work, providing essential equipment and offering many training opportunities. I couldn’t ask for a better start in forestry.

Are woodlands a passion of yours?

At first, no. I finished my A-Levels and had no Idea what I wanted to do for a career, but I knew I wanted to work outdoors. I decided to do a forestry management course at the University of Cumbria on a whim and instantly loved it. I had never really thought about the importance of woodlands beyond their production of oxygen and as a place to go for a walk.

Seeing the vast scope of industry reliant on forest products and learning how sustainable forest management benefits the wider environment and the health and well-being of society, made me realise that woodlands should be treasured and protected by all.

What are you most looking forward to in your role?

Forestry and its related sectors comprise a wide range of disciplines and everyone I have met so far has had a wealth of knowledge and experience, and a passion for their respective fields.

I always learn something new when talking to colleagues or meeting woodland owners / managers on site. This, in combination with the many training and learning opportunities provided by Cumbria Woodlands, mean I can look forward to expanding my knowledge and experience while in this role and hopefully this will continue throughout my career.

Have you always lived in the Lake District?

I’m originally from the North East but after moving to the Lake District for university I couldn’t leave…

There’s a reason so many people visit the national park each year, the landscape is stunning and there’s no end of things to do if you enjoy being outdoors. I’m very fortunate to be able to live and work here.

What is your favourite place in the Lake District?

As a forester, you would probably think it would be a pristine woodland somewhere or the location of a remarkable ancient tree, but I prefer a challenging hike up a fell.

My favourite area at the moment is the Langdale Pikes and If I’m feeling brave, I’ll scramble up Jacks Rake along the way. I should also mention my favourite woodland though, which is Heald Wood, a National Trust site on the west shore of Windermere with a nice mixture of ancient broad-leaved woodland, large conifers and excellent views across the lake.

What are your passions outside of work?

Outside of work I enjoy climbing, hiking, and wild camping… and pretty much anything else you can do outdoors in the lakes. I also play the drums whenever I get the chance which, to the delight of my next door neighbours, isn’t too often.

Photo Ewen Turner / Cumbria Woodlands

Lakes Distillery makes splash with clean water scheme

Funding is available to community groups keen to be kind to lakes and rivers across Cumbria.

Lake District Foundation has joined forces with The Lakes Distillery to launch a £25k funding pot for projects that enhance and conserve water quality.

The Lakes Distillery Water Fund is designed to support community and volunteer-led groups in their efforts to deliver water quality schemes.

Funding is available thanks to fantastic fundraising efforts and donations from The Lakes Distillery which can be found on the banks of the River Derwent.

Staff from the company will also be on hand to donate their time by helping at some of the successful projects.

Sarah Smith, Lake District Foundation Operations Manager, said: “We are delighted to launch this new Water Grant Fund thanks to the generosity of The Lakes Distillery. We are keen to award funding to the very best community-led projects in the Lake District which make a lasting improvement to water quality in our rivers and lakes.”

Nigel Mills, co-founder and CEO at The Lakes Distillery, said “As part of The Lake District community, our sense of responsibility is long-standing but trying to do good within the distillery alone is not nearly enough. That is why we are excited to be able to support the fantastic work Sarah and the team at The Foundation do to protect and care for our National Park.

“Working towards a common goal, we cannot wait to see the projects that come out of the Water Fund, and for our team to have the chance to spend time helping to deliver some of them.”

Projects must focus on water quality in the Lake District and demonstrate that they will contribute to at least one of the following objectives: pollution prevention and mitigation, habitat creation and protection, invasive species control, species conservation or education.

Lake District Foundation welcomes applications from community organisations that meet set criteria.

The total pot size is £25,000 and applications are welcomed for projects valued at £5,000.

The Fund opens for applications on 7 February and the closing date is 21 March.

Details and how to apply here.

Young people connect with nature

The Lake District Foundation supported a project which sees young people experiencing nature and exploring potential careers in the countryside.

The sessions opened a door on the great outdoors, inviting students to immerse themselves in nature, building skills and confidence in safe surroundings.

We spoke to Marion Brown from Rusland Horizons about the success of two ‘bushcraft days’ which saw young people, with limited access to nature, learning countryside skills from yesteryear.

Tell us about the work of Rusland Horizons.

Marion: “Rusland Horizons Trust is a charitable community trust. It relies on, and welcomes, the support of its local community and members and is proud to work alongside them to achieve a Living Landscape, Thriving Community within the unique and beautiful Rusland valley.

“Rusland Horizon’s conservation work manages and enables nature recovery and regeneration, protecting precious habitats which are home to many fascinating, and sometimes rare, wildlife and ecosystems.

“This is done through practical conservation activities supported by members, local communities in the Rusland valley, volunteers and via outreach projects such as the Broadening Horizons initiative with Furness College.”

Tell us about the bushcraft days which Lake District Foundation supported.

Marion “The bushcraft days were an opportunity to immerse the students in the countryside and woodlands of the Rusland valley. They enabled those who might not usually spend much time in the outdoors to build confidence within this environment and encourage interaction with the countryside on an ongoing basis.

“Organised in partnership with Woodmatters, the bushcraft days helped the young people deepen their connection with nature through learning a number of every-day primitive skills used thousands of years ago, such as tracking, fire lighting and whittling.

“The students also learned greenwood skills and made spatulas by whittling off-cuts of wood and using simple tools. There was also the chance to help with a charcoal burn, making barbecue charcoal in the woods using a kiln.

The students not only got hands-on learning new skills but they were encouraged to explore and connect with nature in many different ways.

“It is hoped that this new appreciation for the woodland landscape will encourage them to continue with their interest in nature, be protective of it and possibly volunteer for an organisation like Rusland Horizons in the future.”

Why is it important for young people to get out into nature?

Marion: “The threat of climate change, loss of biodiversity and the importance of prioritising nature are messages that our young people are all too familiar with. Very often they are the ones leading the way, calling for action to protect and conserve our landscapes, habitats, wildlife and communities.

“Time spent in nature and the great outdoors has numerous benefits for all of us. For some young people with limited access to the outdoors, due to economic disadvantage, this can be magnified.

“Our aim is to remove the barriers that prevent disadvantaged young people having the opportunity to experience what many of us take for granted.

“This includes providing transport from towns to the countryside and providing a safe place to experience nature. In addition to the physical gains that can be achieved, such as improved health and mental well-being, the opportunity to be immersed in nature can be, for some, life changing, building new skills and confidence.

“Nature and our environment is at a critical point and our young people are vital in ensuring the protection of our natural world. Engaging them, educating them and allowing them the opportunity to experience all that nature has to offer, will help to show the immense benefits nature can provide and hopefully instill a sense of protection towards it.”

Learn more about Rusland Horizons

Help Lake District Foundation continue to support fantastic initiatives across the Lake District here

Fund’s boost for tree recovery

A new campaign is launched to help Lake District woodlands recover from Storm Arwen.

Thousands of trees were felled causing terrible damage to woodlands across the county.

It’s been almost one month since the storm ripped through Cumbria, leaving significant damage in its wake.

Orrest Head in Windermere suffered around 75 felled trees. Mayor Adrian Legge is pictured surveying storm damage this week.

The Lake District Foundation’s Real Hedge Fund – which helps create and restore Cumbria’s hedgerows – will turn its focus to planting new trees and hedges lost in the storm.

The charity will match-fund donations up to £5000.

Every £25 donated by individuals or businesses will help create one metre of bio-diverse hedgerow or up to five saplings for replanting.

Sarah Swindley, CEO, Lake District Foundation, said: “You only have to walk around the county to see the scale of destruction to our woodlands following Storm Arwen.

“Our existing Real Hedge Fund campaign has been helping to restore Cumbria’s hedgerows. Given the impact of Storm Arwen we are now extending that campaign to include replanting of trees felled in the storm.”

You can donate here: The Real Hedge Fund – Lake District

 

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Festive windfall for Fix the Fells

The Lake District Foundation has smashed its target of raising 25k for Fix the Fells.

A week-long Big Give fundraising drive has seen more than £27k raised.

The Foundation says a big thank-you to everyone who supported this campaign.

The last few years have seen many more people discovering the amazing upland paths of the Lake District. The Foundation is glad people share our love for this place, but the work of the Fix the Fells partnership is never more needed to help maintain and protect footpaths on our beautiful mountains.

This year’s Big Give got off to a flyer with two match funding champions: The Langdale Estate and LDF Chair, Gill Houston who walked all the “The Birketts” peaks. Between them we have £12,400 of match funding that means any donation is doubled.

More than 40 individuals and businesses including Langdale Hotel, Inspired By Lakeland, The Climbers Shop Ambleside, Cedar Manor Hotel, Burnhow Hotel and Montane helped raise a total of £27125.

Sarah Swindley, CEO, Lake District Foundation, said: “We are delighted to have smashed our target. Thank-you to everyone who has supported the Big Give this year. It is so important that we continue to care for our path network in the Lake District. Fix the Fells staff and volunteers do incredible work in the most challenging conditions.”

The Lake District Foundation has over 20 years’ experience working with local partners and is always looking for new ways to work together to help a achieve its goals. Much of the money given away in grants is raised by local businesses. Please get in touch if you want to help us do more of this.

There are several different fundraising mechanisms designed to work with your business, including opt-in donations, events, and sponsored products to name a few.

If you would like to find out more, please visit the charity’s website, www.lakedistrictfoundation.org/fundraising-in-your-business or contact Steve Tonkin via email, [email protected].

Lake District Environmental Charity offers grants to help fund local projects for COP26 goals.

The Lake District Foundation, a local sustainability and conservation charity wants to support local groups to help meet  COP26. During the Conference, The Lake District Foundation will support up to 20 projects with a grant of up to £500 to help tackle the climate crisis we are facing. One of the main aims of COP26 is to: Adapt to protect communities and natural habitats. The Lake District Foundation are opening our small grants fund of £10,000 to help  achieve that aim. We are inviting local groups,  and communities to help us make a real difference in the Lake District and Cumbria to move us towards the COP26 Goals. 

If you have been inspired by COP26 and feel you have a project that can help the Lake District or Cumbria meet the COP26 targets, come and apply for one of our small grants. Grant applications will open 9am 31st Oct 2021 until 5pm Fri, 12th Nov. We have already had two rounds of zero carbon grants and if you are looking for larger grants subscribe via our website to find out when the 3rd round opens. 

Sarah Swindley, CEO, Lake District Foundation, said: “We are proud to work with communities and organisations  who want to care for the spectacular landscapes, wildlife and cultural heritage of the Lake District. We want to work with inspired groups to really make a difference during COP26”.  

The Lake District Foundation has over 20 years’ experience working with local partners  and are always looking for new ways to work together to help a achieve our goals. Much of the money we give away in grants is raised by local businesses. Please get in touch if you want to help us do more of this.     . There are several different fundraising mechanisms designed to work with your business, including opt-in donations, events, and sponsored products to name a few. If you would like to find out more, please visit the charity’s website, lakedistrictfoundation.org/fundraising-in-your-business or contact Steve Tonkin via email, [email protected].  

ENDS  

Notes to Editors:  

  • The Lake District Foundation, registered charity number 1174201, inspires people to donate to projects that care for the spectacular wildlife, landscapes and cultural heritage of the Lake District and Cumbria.  The LDF supports the delivery of the shared aims of the Lake District National Park Partnership as the main fundraising and grant making partner. This is achieved through innovative and successful fundraising campaigns locally, nationally and internationally. The Lake District Foundation encourages partners to work together to ensure a coordinated approach to fundraising and income generation. For more information visit www.lakedistrictfoundation.org
  • For more information, please contact Steve Tonkin at the Lake District Foundation on: 07731567488 or email [email protected] 

Low Carbon Lake District Grant Scheme Round 2 Update

Following a successful first round, the Lake District Foundation has received 35 registrations from organisations within the Lake District National Park in round 2, spread geographically across Allerdale, Copeland, Eden, South Lakeland District Council. The second round closed for registrations on Thursday 14th October 2021 5:00PM

Organisations that registered included limited companies, sole traders, registered charities and partnerships, and covered a range of sectors including Education, Food Production, Hospitality and leisure, Retail, Transport, Arts and Religion.

The majority of organisations employ under 10 people showing how important these funding sources are to small businesses.

Organisations were interested to receive support for the following types of projects; Solar PV, heat pumps, biomass boilers, insulation, LED lighting , energy efficient appliances, infrared heating and rainwater harvesting.

We look forward to assessing the eligibility of these organisations and hearing more about their Low Carbon projects in due course. The aim of this grant fund is to achieve savings of 86 tonnes of CO2 across the park.

Qualifying organisations will be awarded up to 60% of project costs, helping to make the move to low carbon technologies and practices more affordable.

To be notified when the next round opens for registrations (likely Spring 2022) please sign up to our newsletter here https://www.lakedistrictfoundation.org/apply-for-a-grant/

About this project

This project is supported by the European Structural Investment Fund as part of the Low Carbon Lake District Project. 

The Low Carbon Lake District initiative is a comprehensive programme to help tackle climate change in the National Park, working in partnership with local businesses and communities to reduce greenhouse gases and prepare for the impacts of climate change. Led by the Lake District National Park Authority, other key partners include the Lake District Foundation, the National Trust, South Lakeland District Council and Cumbria Tourism.

The project has received funding from the England European Structural and Investment Funds Growth Programme 2014- 2020. The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and the Department for Work and Pensions (and in London the intermediate body Greater London Authority) are the Managing Authorities for European Regional Development Fund and European Social Fund funding through the Growth Programme, funds established by the European Union to help local areas stimulate their economic development. By investing in projects the funds will help to support innovation, businesses, skills and employment to improve local growth and create jobs. For more information visit: https://www.gov.uk/europeangrowth-funding

The Northern Powerhouse is a key aspect of this Government’s approach to addressing the productivity gap in the North and ensuring a stronger, more sustainable economy for all parts of the UK. Alongside over €1.5 billion of European Regional Development Fund support for businesses and communities across the North, the government has awarded £3.4 billion in three rounds of Growth Deals across the Northern Powerhouse.

State Aid Notice

This is a fantastic opportunity for businesses and community groups to make a real difference to the sustainability of Cumbria, to build back better, and create a greener future.

In order to avoid public funding distorting competition within the European common market, the European Commission sets limits on the levels of assistance which the public sector can provide to businesses (“the state aid rules”).   

Any assistance provided through this scheme will comply with the state aid rules by applying De Minimis Exemption, EC Regulation 1407/2013 (24 December 2013) in the first instance, and the General Block Exemption Regulation (GBER), EC Regulation 651/2014 (17 June 2014) may also be applied.   

Photo credit: Oliver Rudkin / 10:10

Low Carbon Lake District Grant Scheme Round 2 – Open for registrations

Following a successful first round, the Low Carbon Lake District Grant Scheme will re-open for registrations on Thursday 23rd September 2021 9:00 AM until Thursday 14th October 2021 5:00PM.

Funding is available to community groups and businesses from a range of sectors operating in the Lake District National Park, for delivery of projects that reduce operational carbon footprint. Examples include renewable energy generation and energy efficiency projects.

Qualifying organisations will be awarded up to 60% of project costs, helping to make the move to low carbon technologies and practices more affordable.

Sarah Swindley, CEO, Lake District Foundation says: “It’s fantastic news that there’s been such a great take up with these grants already and we are delighted to be able to support local organisations to deliver low carbon projects. The Grant Scheme can support SMEs and community groups across a wide range of sectors and we look forward to assessing the next round of projects.”

The registration form and guidance can be found on the Lake District Foundation website, lakedistrictfoundation.org/low-carbon-lake-district-grants

Examples of organisations and projects already supported include Rookhow Quaker Meeting House who were awarded a grant to install an Air Source Heat Pump and loft insulation to improve the comfort levels in the building while reducing the carbon footprint. Levens Village Shop were awarded a grant to install an energy efficient refrigeration system. Up to 60% of the carbon footprint of retail businesses can be attributed to refrigeration, and this project addresses this issue.

Vanessa Riley, Levens Village Shop says: “We’d have struggled to complete the work without the grant received from the foundation. I would encourage anyone who is wanting to make improvements to their own carbon footprint to get in touch.”  

The launch of the second round coincides with the Ambleside to Zero event on Thursday 23rd September 2021 where a member of the team will be on hand to answer any questions.

Unfortunately, we are not able to accept registrations from outside the National Park boundary in this round.

About this project

This project is supported by the European Structural Investment Fund as part of the Low Carbon Lake District Project. 

The Low Carbon Lake District initiative is a comprehensive programme to help tackle climate change in the National Park, working in partnership with local businesses and communities to reduce greenhouse gases and prepare for the impacts of climate change. Led by the Lake District National Park Authority, other key partners include the Lake District Foundation, the National Trust, South Lakeland District Council and Cumbria Tourism.

The project has received funding from the England European Structural and Investment Funds Growth Programme 2014- 2020. The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and the Department for Work and Pensions (and in London the intermediate body Greater London Authority) are the Managing Authorities for European Regional Development Fund and European Social Fund funding through the Growth Programme, funds established by the European Union to help local areas stimulate their economic development. By investing in projects the funds will help to support innovation, businesses, skills and employment to improve local growth and create jobs. For more information visit: https://www.gov.uk/europeangrowth-funding

The Northern Powerhouse is a key aspect of this Government’s approach to addressing the productivity gap in the North and ensuring a stronger, more sustainable economy for all parts of the UK. Alongside over €1.5 billion of European Regional Development Fund support for businesses and communities across the North, the government has awarded £3.4 billion in three rounds of Growth Deals across the Northern Powerhouse.

State Aid Notice

This is a fantastic opportunity for businesses and community groups to make a real difference to the sustainability of Cumbria, to build back better, and create a greener future.

In order to avoid public funding distorting competition within the European common market, the European Commission sets limits on the levels of assistance which the public sector can provide to businesses (“the state aid rules”).   

Any assistance provided through this scheme will comply with the state aid rules by applying De Minimis Exemption, EC Regulation 1407/2013 (24 December 2013) in the first instance, and the General Block Exemption Regulation (GBER), EC Regulation 651/2014 (17 June 2014) may also be applied.   

Photo credit: Kristian Buus / 10:10

Second Round of Hedgerow Funding Available In Cumbria

The second round of funding for the protection and creation of native hedgerows in Cumbria is now open.  

The Fund has £5,000 available in this call, running from 9am Monday 30th August – 5pm Sunday 12th September 2021. 

The Real Hedge Fund is made up of donations from businesses, visitors and residents who love the Lake District and want to help the cause of protecting native hedgerows and the wildlife that depends on them.  

The Lake District Foundation launched the fundraising initiative in June 2020 in partnership with Ullswater Catchment Management CIC, The Food, Farming and Countryside Commission, Cumbria Wildlife Trust, Woodland Trust and Eden Rivers Trust.  

The Lake District Foundation and partners are looking for those who will use the Fund to purchase and plant native hedgerows between 50-100 metres, either double or singled fenced or those looking to restore native hedgerows using techniques such as “gapping up”. This is therefore aimed at farmers, SME businesses, small charities and community groups operating in Cumbria. 

Sarah Swindley, CEO, Lake District Foundation said: We’re pleased to have the second round open ahead of the autumn planting season. The first call earlier this year was a huge success! We awarded four projects between £500 – £2,300, they all demonstrated environmental value either by planting new native hedgerow or restoration of old hedgerows and opportunities to allow for community engagement. We are looking forward to seeing who applies for this second round and wish everyone the best of luck”.  

Applications will only be accepted if environmental value can be evidenced. Activity cannot be “doubled funded” and applicants will need to show that their proposal is not covered by an existing stewardship or grant funding scheme. 

The application form and guidance can be found on the Lake District Foundation website, lakedistrictfoundation.org/apply-for-a-grant/.  Applications that meet the criteria will be reviewed by the grants panel, and shortlisted applicants may be invited to meet the panel virtually and discuss their project further. 

One of the successful projects awarded a grant in the first round earlier this year, Hutton Head Farm in Penrith, have started work on creating a new 84 metre ‘corridor’ hedge to join a 20 acre semi-natural ancient woodland (The Holghyll Wood) with a 9 acre hay meadow (Lacet Hill).  

Phil Davies, Owner of Hutton Head Farm, explains: “We were delighted to receive funding from the Real Hedge Fund grant. Such a superb scheme to help protect our native hedgerows. Since receiving the grant in May we’ve ordered the hedgerow plants in preparation for the hedgerow planting season this Autumn. We will start planting in December and January and will start erecting the double fence with the help of a fencing contractor on the farm from now onwards. The fund is allowing us to create a new hedge to link key habitats together creating an important wildlife corridor. I would like to thank everyone who donated to the campaign to make this funding possible”.  
 

For a full update on the four projects awarded a grant earlier this year, visit https://www.lakedistrictfoundation.org/the-real-hedge-fund/  

The campaign is still live, and you can still donate. To find out more about the Real Hedge Fund and to donate visit https://www.lakedistrictfoundation.org/the-real-hedge-fund/ 

Lake District and Cumbria Visitor Survey 2021

Share your experience and be in with a chance to win!

The team at Visit Lake District, Cumbria would love to hear about your visit to our county to help them better understand what’s important to you and how they can make your next visit even more enjoyable.

So, please do take just a few minutes to complete their short survey – it takes just a few minutes and by completing you’ll also be able to enter an exclusive prize draw!

Click here to take part in the visitor survey.

Thank you!

Celebrating 70 years of the Lake District National Park

The Lake District National Park Authority was created to help look after this unique corner of England, encouraging people to enjoy and understand its beauty and helping those who live and work here. Home to flourishing wildlife, thriving communities and spectacular landscapes, loved by millions and cared for by many, the Lake District was designated a National Park on 9 May 1951, 70 years ago! To mark 70 years of caring for the National Park, the Lake District 10 achievements over the years.

To mark 70 years of caring for the National Park, the Lake District National Park have shared some of their top 10 achievements over the years.

Activities for all – 48 Miles without Stiles routes across the National Park that are suitable for people with limited mobility, including wheelchair users, families with pushchairs, and those who want a simple route to see some beautiful scenery without too much effort.

Low Carbon for all – Low Carbon Lake District was launched in 2008 by the Lake District National Park to reduce greenhouse gases and prepare for the impacts of climate change. 

Working togetherThe Partnership was established in 2006 to bring together 25 organisations to collectively manage the Lake District.

International recognition – The Lake District National Park was inscribedWorld Heritage Site status for its cultural heritage and landscape in 2017. 

Heritage project success – The 400 year old Coniston Coppermines was taken off the At Risk Register in 2018 after we worked with local landowners, volunteers and businesses to preserve the site and install new creative storytelling within the valley. Similarly, the Duddon Iron Furnace was recently saved from the At Risk Register due to the continued good work of our archeologists and partners.

Landscape restoration – Between 2016 and 2019 the Lake District National Park worked with the community and partners to celebrate the heritage and restore the landscape in the Rusland valley.This major project created apprenticeships and connected people with the traditional skills that protected the wildlife and wooded landscape of the area.

A resilient National Park – Following the destruction of Storm Desmond in December 2015, Lake District National Park delivered Routes to Resilience, a £3 million programme to restore the Public Rights of Way network.

More than 400 hands –  more than 400 volunteers who help look after the Park in various ways from research to maintenance work out on the fells. Our dedicated Fix the Fells volunteers help repair paths from erosion on the high fells and protect the ecology and archaeological heritage of our beautiful landscape.

Housing – Lack of affordable housing is a national issue, but the need is even more acute in the Lake District. Lake District National Park are responsible for planning, we try to make sure new buildings or conversions are of a type needed by people who live and work locally.

A warm welcome – The National Park welcomes over 19 million visitors each year. 

Let us know what you love most about the Lake District using #LakeDistrict70 on social media! For more information visit the Lake District National Park’s website here.

Lake District Foundation receives grant of £249,000 from the Government’s Green Recovery Challenge Fund

The Lake District Foundation has been awarded a grant from the Government’s £40 million second round of the Green Recovery Challenge Fund, a multi-million pound boost for green jobs and nature recovery

Ninety nature projects across England have been awarded grants from £68,100 to £1,950,000 to create and retain over 1,000 green jobs, backed by the Government’s £80 million Green Recovery Challenge Fund.

Work will be carried out on over 600 sites from North Northumberland to the tip of Cornwall, and combined with the first round, almost a million trees will be planted, contributing towards the Government’s commitment to treble tree planting rates across England by the end of this Parliament.

Our project, delivered in partnership with Cumbria Woodlands and United Utilities, will deliver important nature restoration activities.

Funding will enable the delivery of vital restoration work on some of the most importance Ancient Woodland sites in the Thirlmere Valley, and which include SSSI’s and Plantations on Ancient Woodland sites.  Funding will also enable the creation of a new full-time post, supporting a graduate forester to hone and develop their skills – vital to ensure a skills pipeline into the conversation sector

Alongside this, we will provide promotion and advice on woodland creation and management to landowners and managers.  

The Green Recovery Challenge Fund is a key part of the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan to kick-start nature recovery and tackle climate change. Connecting people with nature is another priority theme: by increasing access to nature and greenspaces, projects will support both physical and mental wellbeing. The Government’s Green Recovery Challenge Fund was developed by Defra and its Arm’s-Length Bodies  The fund is being delivered by The National Lottery Heritage Fund in partnership with Natural England, the Environment Agency and Forestry Commission.

Environment Minister, Rebecca Pow, said:

“The diverse and ambitious projects being awarded funding today will help environmental organisations employ more people to work on tree-planting, nature restoration and crucially, help more of the public to access and enjoy the outdoors.

“Through our £80 million Fund, we are on track to support over 2,500 jobs, plant                 almost a million trees and increase nature recovery at a huge scale across the                 country, which will help us deliver against our 25 Year Environment Plan.”

Ros Kerslake, Chief Executive, National Lottery Heritage Fund, said: 

“From wetland restoration, to creating wildlife-rich habitat for bees, it is vital that we value, protect and rebuild our natural heritage. This new funding will not only allow projects to carry out direct conservation which is essential in protecting our biodiversity, but it will increase awareness of how and why we need to change our behaviours in order to protect our future.” 

Emma Howard Boyd, Chair of the Environment Agency, said:

“By supporting jobs from Northumberland to Somerset, the Green Recovery Challenge Fund will help deliver a nature positive future. The fund supports young people to develop skills needed to protect nature, build back greener and prepare for climate impacts, like floods and heatwaves.”

 Natural England Chair Tony Juniper said:

“Our environmental and conservation charity sector does an incredible job in protecting, improving and restoring the natural environment for the benefit of communities and the economy.”

Forestry Commission Chair Sir William Worsley said:

“This funding will help deliver thousands more trees and help us achieve our target of trebling tree planting rates in England by the end of the Parliament. We need to work towards net zero emissions by 2050; to address biodiversity loss; to better connect people with nature; and to create more green jobs in doing so. Trees are central to this and the projects being awarded these grants will have a hugely important role in helping us realise these objectives.”

A full list of awards is available to view here.

Highlights

  • The Lake District Foundation project, delivered in partnership with Cumbria Woodlands and United Utilities, will deliver important nature restoration activities. Funding will enable the delivery of vital restoration work on some of the most importance Ancient Woodland sites in the Thirlmere Valley, and which include SSSI’s and Plantations on Ancient Woodland sites.  Funding will also enable the creation of a new full-time post, supporting a graduate forester to hone and develop their skills – vital to ensure a skills pipeline into the conversation sector. Alongside this, we will provide promotion and advice on woodland creation and management to landowners and managers.  
  • 90 projects awarded grants to accelerate the implementation of nature-based projects, from new ‘insect pathways’ in our countryside and towns, to tree planting projects in deprived urban areas
  • Second funding round of Green Recovery Challenge Fund backed by £40 million, with over 1,000 jobs to be created or retained in England

£4,000 Fundraising Campaign Launched For The Lake District

The Lake District Foundation is taking part in an exciting match funding campaign to raise funds for the Lake District.

The charity are seeking to raise £4,000 by the 31st August 2021!

If the Lake District Foundation are one of the first 50 charities to raise at least £4,000 (excluding Gift Aid) from 50 donors through Giving Checkout between July 1 and August 31, the charity will receive a £2,000 unrestricted gift from JustGiving.

The initiative is to celebrate the launch of our new fee-free direct donation tool, Giving Checkout and are giving away £130,000 in unrestricted funding!


Plus, every charity that raises £4,000 will be placed in a draw to win one of three additional £10,000donations! 

Can you help? Donate today, visit: justgiving.com/donation

Stay Carbon Monoxide Safe 4 Summer

Carbon monoxide outside of the home

It’s not just in the house that you must be carbon monoxide safe. Anywhere that fossil fuels are burnt, CO can occur. Ensure that appliances are checked and maintained, barbecues are ALWAYS in open air (even after they have gone out), and you have a CO alarm present.

  1. Camping Tents – Never take a camping stove into a tent. Even after extinguishing. CO can continue to be produced for hours
  2. Caravans and Motorhomes – Appliances such as gas fires/cookers, or petrol-powered generators should be maintained and a CO alarm installed
  3. Boats – Similar to caravans and motorhomes, boats can contain fuel burning devices which should be maintained and a CO alarm should be present.
  4. Car Exhausts – Car exhausts produce carbon monoxide, so never leave a car running in a confined space, such as a garage.

The Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning

Carbon monoxide starves the body of oxygen. Making individuals feel unwell, and therefore is potentially mistaken as a cold or flu. The longer the exposure to carbon monoxide, the worse the symptoms become. High levels of carbon monoxide exposure can be fatal.

  1. Headaches
  2. Dizzyness, tireness or confusion
  3. Stomach pain or sickness
  4. Difficulty breathing

#Safe4Summer

Find out more, visit

unitedagainstco.com/cosafe4summer

Lake District Foundation Welcomes New Trustee

The Lake District Foundation, the local sustainability and conservation charity caring for the Lake District, welcomes a new trustee to the board, Dan Visser, to the board.  

Dan moved to the Lake District in 1999 to further his career in hospitality and for lifestyle reasons. Dan has been an active member of the tourism and hospitality sector in the Lake District and Cumbria over the last two decades.  

Dan joined Langdale Leisure in 2008 as Director of Sales and Marketing, returning the business to profitability and part of the team which delivers sustainable solutions and supports local communities. 

Dan Visser, Director of Sales and Marketing at Langdale Leisure, said “I am delighted to join the board at the Lake District Foundation. I have been working hard to develop and support a sustainable visitor economy here in the Lake District and Cumbria through my position at Langdale and as non-executive director and vice chair of Cumbria Tourism. The opportunity to support the team at the Lake District Foundation care for our special landscape is one I am very much looking forward to”. 

The Lake District Foundation works with businesses, visitors and other donors to support conservation, environmental and cultural heritage projects and programmes of work to help look after the Lake District National Park.  

Gill Houston, Lake District Foundation’s Chair, said: “We are delighted to welcome Dan as a new trustee to the Lake District Foundation. Dan brings a wealth of experience and knowledge in the tourism and hospitality sector which will strengthen the work the Lake District Foundation is aiming to achieve. We are looking forward to working with Dan to drive our environmental goals forward”

The Lake District Foundation is a registered charity and is governed by a board of volunteer trustees including prominent representatives from the environment, business and tourisms sectors in the Lake District and Cumbria.  

The Lake District Foundation are always keen to hear from individuals interested in joining the board, if you are interested send an email to [email protected] or visit lakedistrictfoundation.org.   

Conservation Charity Awards Hedgerow Grants

The Lake District Foundation, the local organisation helping look after nature and culture in the Lake District and Cumbria, have awarded grants from the Real Hedge Fund Campaign, part of their latest fundraising initiative.  

The successful projects have been awarded between £500 – £2,300 from a new fund launched last April by the Lake District Foundation and partners for the protection and creation of native hedgerows in Cumbria. The partners include the Ullswater Catchment Management CIC, The Food, Farming and Countryside Commission, Cumbria Wildlife Trust, Woodland Trust and Eden Rivers Trust.  

The Fund aims to highlight the importance of hedgerows in the environment and the role within the cultural and natural heritage of the Lake District and has an ambitious target to plant 4,000 metres of native hedgerows across Cumbria.   

Sarah Swindley, CEO, Lake District Foundation said: We’ve had a fantastic response to this round of funding. Thank-you to all those who applied and congratulations to those who were successful. The grants have been awarded to those who demonstrated environmental value either by planting new native hedgerow or restoration of old hedgerows and opportunities to allow for community engagement. In total the grants awarded will fund 400 metres of native hedgerow in Cumbria. We look forward to sharing the stories and impact the funding will have”

Four projects have been selected, a brief summary of each can be found below but you can find further information and keep in touch with the projects’ impacts at lakedistrictfoundation.org

  • Holghyll Wood to Lacet Hay Meadow, Hutton Head Farm, Penrith. A new 84metre ‘corridor’ hedge will be created to join a 20 acre semi-natural ancient woodland (The Holghyll Wood) with a 9 acre hay meadow (Lacet Hill). The new hedge will link key habitats together creating an important wildlife corridor.  
  • Holme House Farm, Skelsmergh  
    A new hedge will be created around the south and east boundaries of Holme House Farm and will extend the native woodland by 3000 sq m. Holme House Farm are a co-housing group building 5 eco-homes and living communally on a currently derelict farm with 12 acres of land in the River Sprint valley. The group seek to live together in ways that minimise the environmental impact and restore and enhance the wildlife and habitats of the woodland, river and meadows on our land. 
  • Low Park Hedge, Tebay 
    To restore an ancient hedge and fence both sides to protect it. Currently, the hedge is very overgrown but is used by red squirrels. It is a vital link between ancient woodland and a newly established wildlife area. Low Borrowbridge Farm is trying to make a 3.5-mile nature recovery network for the squirrels, working with Penrith Red Squirrels.  
  • Barn at Thwaite Head, Ulverston  
    A restoration project of an old barn and traditional orchard, using regenerative and holistic management principles. The installation of the new hedgerow will create additional biodiversity and benefit future orchard tree plantings and meadow grasses by creating a biodiverse area which can be resilient to pests, and benefit local wildlife and thrive. 

The next round of funding will be in September 2021 with £5,000 available. Further information about how to apply and the criteria will be available on the charities grant funding section of their website, lakedistrictfoundation.org/apply-for-a-grant/

The Real Hedge Fund is made up of donations from businesses, visitors and residents who love the Lake District and want to help the cause of protecting native hedgerows and the wildlife that depends on them. The campaign is still live, and you can still donate. To find out more about the Real Hedge Fund and to donate visit lakedistrictfoundation.org/the-real-hedge-fund/ 

Back To Top