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Cumbria Hedgerow Campaign Receives Donation Boost

A fundraising campaign aiming to raise £100,000 to create and reinstate 4,000 metres of native hedgerows in the Lake District has received a generous boost from the Woodland Trust. 
 
The Lake District Foundation, Ullswater Catchment Management CIC, Food, Farming and Countryside Commission, Cumbria Wildlife Trust and Eden Rivers Trust launched the Real Hedge Fund in June 2020. The campaign aims to highlight the importance of hedgerows in the environment, the role within the cultural and natural heritage of the Lake District and to replant native hedgerows where these have been removed. 
 

The Real Hedge Fund campaign has had a fantastic start with 180 metres of new native hedges donated by the Woodland Trust, which equates to a financial donation of £4,500.  
 

Sarah Swindley, Lake District Foundation’s, CEO said, “We’ve hit the ground running thanks to the Woodland Trust. A huge thank-you to them for leading the way with a superb donation. We have an ambitious plan to plant 4,000 metres of native hedgerow, which costs around £25 per metre to manage and plant across Cumbria and we need your help. We want you to see nature as the best investment with the highest return!”  
 

The local conservation charity, Lake District Foundation, is encouraging everyone to get involved by making a donation from £25 per metre. All information can be found at lakedistrictfoundation.org.  
 

Julia Aglionby, University of Cumbria’s Professor in Practice, said: Since the second world war we have lost over half our hedges, that is over 250,000 miles of hedges and many that are remaining are in poor condition. Hedges are great, they provide food for birds and insects, they are refuges for wildflowers and contain multiple species of trees and shrubs. As importantly they reduce flooding by slowing run off, store carbon and act as corridors for wildlife across more intensively managed farmland. From a farming perspective they are good too, providing sheltered boundaries which as a farmer I know are invaluable in stormy weather.  The Real Hedge Fund campaign is an opportunity to make a difference and raise vital awareness, so we hope you get involved and support us. Thank-you.” 
 
The charity will also be running a larger crowdfunding appeal later in the year through the national Big Give platform. It is the leading online match funder which brings charities, philanthropists and the public together to multiply their impact. The crowdfunding appeal will support the Real Hedge Fund campaign, the charity is looking for a small number of donors to help them kick start this appeal from businesses to individuals.  If you would be interested in getting involved, get in touch with the Lake District Foundation either by email, [email protected] or telephone 01539 822622. 

To make a donation to the Real Hedge Fund and for further information visit https://www.lakedistrictfoundation.org/the-real-hedge-fund/
 

We’ve hit the ground running thanks to the Woodland Trust. A huge thank-you to them for leading the way with a superb donation.

Sarah Swindley, Lake District Foundation’s, CEO

Cedar Manor is open for business and Covid ready

The Foundation works with over 150 business supporters who either fundraise for the charity or make a donation. The businesses have been busy preparing to re-open safely at the start of July following Visit Britain guidelines.  

The Cedar Manor Hotel in Windermere has been a business supporter since 2007 raising over £17,000 for the Foundation during that period. They re-opened their doors at the start of July after receiving their ‘Good to Go’ accreditation from Visit Britain.   

Jonathan Kaye, Owner of The Cedar Manor Hotel, explains,  

“We have gone through quite an extensive program to get Covid-19 safe. We have received our accreditation from Visit Britain, the Good to Go Kitemark, in July and have now opened our doors. 

To get this we have completed 3 key risk assessments that are all focussed on Covid-19.

First a customer journey, from booking to departing, to ensure they will feel confident and safe at all times.

Second, the staff journey, whether chef, housekeeper, front of house or manager, to ensure they are aware of the new standards and rules and can complete their tasks in a safe environment.

Third, the building. We have been working to make this covid safe by the using an external contractor who will use an environmentally friendly chemical to “Fog” all our rooms and public areas (including the terrace) which puts an invisible coating over all surfaces, even fabrics that lasts 28 days.

We have purchased PPE for staff and training plans have been implemented. We have implemented digital signage in place with sanitizing stations at the entrance and entrances to public areas. Our room folders have been replaced with an APP and Hotel TV channels added for those who don’t use a smartphone, with all you need to know about the hotel.

We have sent emails to guests booking with revised information, pre-arrival emails with detailed information regarding to arrival at the hotel and the option to pay online prior to departure, making it a contactless experience. Also, not forgetting with added our Covid Guest Charter on our website too.

Above all, we are reassuring guests that although it sounds like a “new world”, we want them to come and relax knowing that its safe and they are going to be well looked after.”

Why we support the Lake District Foundation?

“Initially, we joined in 2007 shortly after taking over Cedar Manor. We were introduced to the foundation and understood quickly that a few pounds from each guest would do great work for local charities. What struck a cord for us was the Park being a place to come for free and asking the guests for £2 to help keep the footpaths maintained, preserve red squirrels and do other great work was a no-brainer.

We then looked at our “green” journey and visitor giving is part of gaining green accolades, so as we were already embarked on this process, it was a big tick for us. The guests really don’t mind and love the fact that they can contribute to the well-being of the park.”

What struck a cord for us was the Park being a place to come for free and asking the guests for £2 to help keep the footpaths maintained, preserve red squirrels and do other great work was a no-brainer.

Jonathan Kaye, oWNER
cEDAR MANOR
Cedar Manor Hotel 
Jonathan and Caroline Kaye 
cedarmanor.co.uk 

 

Lake District Hotels Association announce LDF as charity partner

The Lake District Hotels Association (LDHA) are excited to announce their 2019 official charity partner will be the Lake District Foundation.

The Lake District Foundation (LDF) is a charity dedicated to care for the Lake District National Park and Cumbria. LDF’s ambition is to raise £1 from each of the 19million visitors to the Lake District.

This newly formed partnership with LDF is a perfect way to celebrate the surrounding natural environment. LDHA, with its 40 members of independent hoteliers and tourist attractions, provide economic growth and employment to the tourism and hospitality industry by inviting national and international visitors to celebrate the beauty of the North West.

Joe Cobb, Chairman of LDHA said: “We are delighted to work closely with such a fantastic charity. The Lake District and Cumbria is such a magical place for everyone to enjoy, we feel it’s incredibly important to maintain this beauty and invest back into the land and the lakes for many years to come.”

LDHA developed The Real Lake District campaign which promotes the Lake District as a holiday destination. This partnership will enable LDF to promote fundraising projects to a growing 70,000 global fan base through the LDHA’s popular social platforms, website and app called The Real Lake District.

LDF CEO Sarah Swindley commented: “We are absolutely thrilled to be announced as the official charity partner for the Lake District Hotels Association. By working together with the Association it will unlock a coordinated approach to fundraising and provide a greater platform to inspire people to care for and donate to projects that look after the spectacular wildlife, landscapes and cultural heritage of the Lake District and Cumbria

As the official charity partner, the LDHA will recognise and promote the Lake District Foundation as their main charity, as well as supporting a variety of local initiatives and alongside their own individual charity work.

Love Langdales Crowdfunding Campaign – we did it!

A massive thank you to everyone who helped us to reach our target of £5,000 for our Love Langdale Crowdfunder campaign, we are extremely grateful for your support.

The task of keeping the Lake District’s paths in good shape falls to footpath repair partnership Fix the Fells, who rely entirely on grants and donations to do their work. Your donation will be used to repair and maintain the upland path from Stake Pass to Pike O’Stickle, via Martcrag Moor in the Langdales.

We intend to carry out the repairs and maintenance in the 2019 fell season with assistance from specialist rangers from the Fix the Fells team. With your donation we are able to:

• build new sections of a sheep fleece path,
• tackle landscape erosion scars and gullies,
• define and rationalise the line of the path, avoiding a fragile upland bog habitat,
• ensure more effective drainage for the path.

This work will help to prevent the spread of ugly erosion scars in the beautiful fells, as well as provide key conservation and environmental benefits including preserving upland habitats for plant species and preventing sediment run-off into streams and tarns.

Thank you again for everyone’s donation, it really will make a difference!

Managing the biodiversity of the Lake District National Park

The Lake District Foundation has awarded a grant of £4,500 to the Cumbria Local Nature Partnership, enabling them to lead the development of a clear, strategic approach for managing the biodiversity of the Lake District National Park.

Local Nature Partnerships have been established to drive positive change in the local natural environment.  This funding will enable them to consider the broad picture across Cumbria, pooling knowledge and indentifying any gaps and challenges.  We will then be able to ensure that future funding is invested in the best possible places and projects, with the right people involved to deliver measurable benefits for wildlife, people and the economy.

We look forward to the development of this strategy, which will help us all ensure that we care for and protect the landscapes, wildlife and cultural heritage of the English Lake District in the best possible way.

‘Cultural Heritage’ within the Lake District World Heritage Site – Join the discussion

lake district world heritage site

The Lake District’s World Heritage Site inscription includes its Cultural Heritage – but what does that mean?  If you live or work in or close to the Lake District, you will now have an opportunity to join in the discussion to help define and manage this special characteristic of the area.

The Lake District Foundation has awarded £4,500 for a series of community workshops to be held throughout Cumbria and the Lake District to help residents understand and take ownership of the Cultural Heritage of the Lake District World Heritage Site.

A pilot event held in May 2018 clearly demonstrated that there is currently a lack of understanding about World Heritage Status and what it might mean for local communities in the Lake District.  Equally important is the impact on communities on the periphery of the designated World Heritage Site.  Participants at the pilot workshop were keen to establish on-going dialogue so that local representatives share in the development of both identity and vision for the World Heritage Site.

Thanks to the funding from the Lake District Foundation, community development organisation ACTion with Communities in Cumbria (ACT) is now able to arrange a series of local engagement workshops.  These will enable residents to explore the benefits, opportunities and challenges presented by the Lake District’s World Heritage Status.  They will give local people an opportunity to help define the identity, protection and management of their cultural heritage.  Residents and community representatives from across the county will have an opportunity to attend workshops in Bootle, Broughton-in-Furness, Keswick, Glenridding and Grasmere.  The events will focus on listening to community views and exploring with them ways to work with the Lake District National Park Partnership (the body responsible for World Heritage Status inscription) to celebrate their cultural heritage and conserve the natural environment.

Tree planting at Mardale Common, Haweswater

The Lake District Foundation has awarded a grant of over £2,000 to the Royal Society for the protection of Birds (RSPB) for tree planting at its Haweswater Nature Reserve at Bampton, near Penrith.  Commencing in November 2018, the project will see 400 trees planted on Mardale Common over the coming two winters.  The new planting will enhance the resilience of the existing ancient woodland, which is vulnerable as trees become older and less able to withstand the spread of disease and the effects of climate change.

This valuable contribution will enable the RSPB to train and equip their active team of local volunteers to plant the saplings, sourced from their own Haweswater tree nursery, to create an area of new woodland on Mardale Common.  The trees will be surrounded with weldmesh protection, nurturing their survival into mature trees.  Planted at low density, the new trees will become the large open-grown landscape trees for future generations.  Currently, these large landscape trees are being lost in Cumbria at a faster rate than they are being replaced, and the Lake District World Heritage Site nomination highlighted the vulnerability of our ageing native tree population and the need for new planting in appropriate places.

The RSPB has extensive experience of tree planting at Haweswater, having managed the area in collaboration with the landowner, United Utilities, for over 40 years.  The project has been developed in consultation with the Woodland Trust, the National Trust and United Utilities to provide a co-ordinated response to the challenges.

The local community welcomes this important project, recognising the importance of woodlands in providing habitat to support a broad range of wildlife, as well as being concerned about the impact on the landscape caused by the loss of ancient trees.  The RSPB already has extensive experience of tree planting at Haweswater, where previous planting work has resulted in an increase in biodiversity, with gains recorded for species including red squirrels, tree pipits and whinchats.  Mardale Common is all designated public access land, and the new area of woodland can be reached using a number of public footpaths that pass nearby.

Whilst the RSPB is hugely grateful to the Lake District Foundation’s supporters whose donations have made this funding possible, they are indebted to their team of around 20 local volunteers who are committed to conserving the wildlife and landscape on their doorstep.  The group is open to all ages and abilities and is always actively seeking new members to join its weekly work parties.

The Lake District Foundation funds work to improve Dash Beck at Bassenthwaite

The Lake District Foundation has approved a grant of over £2,000 towards a project led by the West Cumbria Rivers Trust, working in partnership with Bassenthwaite Rotary Club, to enhance the habitat of Dash Beck and surrounding land.  The project was first conceived by local people, and they will be fundamental to the successful delivery of the works necessary to improve the habitat of Dash Beck for a range of wildlife, particularly salmon and trout.  The project will also improve the safety and accessibility of the footpath from Bassenthwaite village to the lake, benefiting the local community and visitors alike.

The River Derwent, Bassenthwaite Lake’s principal river, is internationally important for its salmon and trout populations but these are currently in decline.  Preliminary work shows that Dash Beck could be an excellent spawning habitat for salmon, trout and other salmonids, but is currently not reaching its potential.  The project will tackle pollution inputs, reduce sediment inputs to the beck, increase in-stream habitat diversity, allow more light to reach the river bed, and will manage the riverside woodland to enhance its suitability for a wider variety of species.  To achieve this, tasks will include clearing and repairing the footpath; stabilising the eroding bank with natural materials; coppicing bankside woodland to allow more light to reach the stream and increase diversity of woodland habitat; pulling Himalayan balsam; and fencing off the beck and footpath from the farmland.  Other planned work includes training for landowners on the benefits of coppicing by Cumbria Woodlands.

As much work as possible will be carried out by volunteers, and activities will give them the opportunity to learn about the stream and the threats it faces.  Volunteers from Bassenthwaite Rotary Club will be trained as Riverfly monitors, taking monthly surveys of invertebrates as indicators of water quality and siltation.  Local volunteers will continue to walk the beck to monitor Himalyan balsam and overgrowth, and will continue to control if necessary.

Work will also be carried out to maintain the footpath alongside Dash Beck down to a quiet area of Bassenthwaite lake shore, where it joins a network of other footpaths, including the long distance ‘Allerdale ramble’ trail.  The project will reduce the risk of bank erosion, making the footpath safer and improving access to the lake.

Dash Beck lies in the northern fells of the English Lake District, descending rapidly from its source on the north facing slopes of the Skiddaw massif over a series of cascades known as Whitewater Dash or Dash Falls, described by Wainwright as the finest succession of falls in the Lake District.  The lower reaches of Dash Beck, which is where the work will be carried out, continue through a small valley of the same name, through the village of Bassenthwaite before flowing into Bassenthwaite Lake at its north-eastern corner.

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