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Donations doubled to help Windermere

Windermere is England’s largest lake – a much loved and iconic feature of the Lake District.

The Lake District Foundation wants to launch community projects that all contribute to the health of the lake and improve water quality.

From noon on Tuesday 29 November to noon Tuesday 6 December we are taking part in the week-long national Big Give Christmas Challenge.

All donations you make over the next seven days will be doubled.

Donate: here

Sarah Swindley, Chief Executive, Lake District Foundation, said: “We know there are some concerns around the health of the lake – particularly around water quality.

“Our project will deliver a range of community activities with the aim of improving water quality in Windermere, with a particular focus on reducing phosphate levels in the lake.

“What’s really exciting is that all donations this week will be doubled in the Big Give Christmas Challenge.”

The Lake District Foundation will deliver a range of activities to increase awareness and knowledge of phosphate pollution, work with local residents, businesses, lake users and visitors to tackle the issue – for example providing education around septic tank use – in order to improve the health of the lake and its habitats.

There are some great projects getting planned to work to improve water quality as part of the Love Windermere Partnership which was launched in summer 2022.

“Coniston combines tranquility and beauty to encourage quiet reflection”

A walking route around Coniston pays tribute to victims and survivors of child abuse.

Messages of hope have been inscribed on plaques on benches and signposts at Monk Coniston.

The route, at the north end of the lake, is one of dozens of locations across England and Wales chosen as part of a legacy project.

In October 2022 the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) published 19 reports covering a wide range of institutions.

These reports will shape recommendations to better protect children in the future.

IICSA’s legacy project pays tribute to all victims and survivors of child sexual abuse and ensure their voices continue to be heard.

Across England and Wales more than 150 memorial benches now bear messages of hope from victims and survivors.

People who use the Monk Coniston Miles Without Stiles route will come across the messages on more than a dozen benches and signposts along the 3.5km route.

We spoke to the IICSA Legacy Project Team to find out more…

Tell us about this IICSA Legacy project.

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse designed its legacy project in consultation with victims and survivors, many of whom said they would like there to be a physical tribute for people to visit. Rather than confine this to a monument in one or two major cities, memorial benches and plaques have been placed across England and Wales. This reflects the widespread engagement with the Inquiry by victims and survivors from all areas of both countries.

Why are you are doing this?

Child sexual abuse has been hidden and its terrible consequences buried, for too long.

The legacy project pays tribute to all victims and survivors and hopes to drive cultural change and ensure the vital public conversation around child sexual abuse continues beyond the lifetime of the Inquiry.

The messages on the plaques are the words of different individuals who engaged with the Inquiry, and will ensure the voices of victims and survivors continue to be heard, so that children may be better protected in the future.

You have put plaques of hope on benches across the UK – why is Coniston one of the routes chosen?

There are more than 150 benches and plaques across England and Wales. To make the project accessible to as many people as possible, we wanted to achieve a good geographical spread over both countries, in a mix of scenic rural locations and busier urban areas.

As one of the best-known places in the hugely popular Lake District, Coniston combines tranquility and beauty to encourage quiet reflection, as well as high footfall.

What do you hope people will get from reading the plaques?

We hope that more open and honest conversations about the difficult topic of child sexual abuse will continue, as this will help to keep children safer.

We also want acknowledgement for victims and survivors and the impacts they live with as a result of their experiences of abuse. Along with the personal messages from them, the address and a QR code for the legacy website appear on the plaques.

The website legacy.iicsa.org.uk will remain after the Inquiry has concluded, to provide information about its work and details of support services for victims and survivors.

It also includes a bench locator tool which will allow people to find their nearest bench or plaque.

Who can use Monk Coniston route?

Everyone! It is classed as a Miles Without Styles route which means it is accessible to people who use wheelchairs. It is family friendly for prams, buggies. People don’t have to take the whole route – they can just do sections if they want.

Where is it exactly? 

Starting from Monk Coniston Car Park the route takes in views of the lake and of the fells including Coniston Old Man. Coniston is home to lots of cafes, restaurants and pubs.

Address: Monk Coniston Car Park, Postcode: LA21 8AH. Grid reference: SD 316978
W3W: ///spectacle.turns.watch

There are toilets at Monk Coniston Car Park.

More information: Miles Without Stiles 16: Monk Coniston : Lake District National Park

Japanese students focus on sustainability

Students from Japan visited the Lake District looking at sustainability in this UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Lake District Foundation partnered with Hidden Lakeland to arrange the ten-day study programme.

Nine undergraduate students on the University of Tokyo’s Global Education for Innovation and Leadership programme stayed in Ambleside and Kendal to gain better understanding of the opportunities and difficulties presented by sustainable tourism in the Lake District National Park.

The students stayed in the heart of the Lake District at the University of Cumbria’s Ambleside campus. Most of the learning was delivered outdoors with a mix of sessions indoors.

This included presentations from representatives of Cumbria Tourism, the Lake District National Park Authority and World Heritage UK.

The group enjoyed walk-and-talk tours and got across the Lake District including Ambleside to Dove Cottage via Rydal Hall and the Coffin Trail.

They enjoyed a workshop hosted by Wordsworth, Grasmere, looking at William Wordsworth’s legacy for the Lakes as a place to visit.

They also met with Sarah Swindley, Chief Executive of the Lake District Foundation, received an insight into woodlands management by Cumbria Woodlands and met farmers working the land.

Tracey Gannon from Hidden Lakeland said: “It was a packed ten days with content, mostly outdoors, delivered by many people who have a passion for the Lake District and its future. Feedback from the students suggests that they found the experience very valuable.”

One student said: “It was very useful to hear from lecturers from different perspectives how things are seen and in what sense sustainability is important, depending on one’s position and principles. In addition, by actually visiting farms and climbing mountains, I was able to experience first-hand the beauty of the landscape and think about the importance of protecting it as my own personal matter.”

Funding available for tree and hedge schemes in Cumbria

The Lake District Foundation is inviting organisations to apply for funding to plant new hedges and trees.

The move comes during National Hedgerow Week (October 10-17th 2022).

Up to £2500 is available through the Real Hedge Fund for groups who wish to reinstate native hedgerows or restore existing ones. The Foundation is asking for applications of up to 100 metres of planting.

This is the third round of funding and dozens of applicants have already benefitted and have been busy planting.

The Real Hedge Fund aims to highlight the importance of hedgerows and trees in the environment and their role within the cultural and natural heritage of the Lake District.

More than 1000 meters of hedgerow has already been planted. The Real Hedge Fund is only open to SMEs businesses, small charities and community groups operating in Cumbria.

Hedgerows are unsung biodiversity heroes, as well as connecting habitats, protecting against pollution and helping fight climate change, they provide a home for 80% of our woodland birds, hedgehogs, most species of bat, the great crested newt, dormice and butterflies.

People can apply to the Real Hedge Fund here.

The closing date for applications has been extended to 5pm Wednesday 23 November 2022.

People can support the Lake District Foundation’s ongoing campaign to support hedgerows and new tree planting here.

The Lake District Foundation launched the Real Hedge Fund in June 2020 in partnership with Ullswater Catchment Management CIC, The Food, Farming and Countryside Commission, Cumbria Wildlife Trust, Woodland Trust and Eden Rivers Trust.

“Love Windermere” – new era for lake

A group of organisations from across Cumbria has come together in partnership to ensure that Windermere gets the focus it needs to face a challenging future.

Nutrients, climate change, more extreme weather patterns and the seasonal variations of the tourist population are all predicted to put the lake and its water quality under increasing pressure in the coming years.

Long-term records show that over that last 70 years the average annual surface temperature of Windermere has increased by 1.7 degrees C, leading to conditions that favour the growth of algae and reduce levels of oxygen.

The Love Windermere partnership has members from a broad range of sectors with the range of expertise and influence needed to bring about action.

Led by the Environment Agency, the partnership includes the Lake District Foundation, Freshwater Biological Association, Lake District National Park Authority, National Farmers Union, National Trust, South Cumbria Rivers Trust and United Utilities.

Sarah Swindley, CEO of the Lake District Foundation, said: “Our job at the LDF is to inspire people to care for all aspects of the Lake District. It’s only by working in partnership that we can ensure that beautiful Windermere can be enjoyed by generations to come.”

Lake District National Park Authority’s Chief Executive, Richard Leafe, said: “Windermere plays a key role in the lives of communities and visitors to the National Park, so it’s vital we work together with partners to improve the health of the lake.

Love Windermere is set to be the most ambitious environmental partnership to date and we’re proud to take part. From individual action on septic tanks to working with land managers and the utility company, the programme will combine expertise with new data to tackle the current challenges and bring long-term benefits to everyone who enjoys Windermere and the National Park beyond.”

The group is developing evidence-based, long-term plans to maintain and improve water quality in the lake while balancing the needs of nature, the community and the local economy.

One of the first aims of Love Windermere is to collate more scientific evidence to understand which solutions will be most effective and to help prioritise activity.

Actions are also taking place to understand what local people think. The Environment Agency recently hosted a citizens’ panel to engage with the community and raise awareness of the challenges affecting the lake.  More than 20 residents got involved and gave their recommendations on where they want to see action start.

“Love Your Lake – The Big Windermere Survey”, took place on Sunday 26 June, with 100 volunteers sampling water at various points around the lake and its tributaries. The results will help experts at Lancaster University and the Freshwater Biological Association to produce the largest ever one-day snapshot of conditions in Windermere.

Other activities this summer include:

  • South Cumbria Rivers Trust is working with volunteers to restore reed beds around the north of the lake, encouraging natural processes to remove nutrients from the lake sediment.
  • The Lake District Foundation is working with owners of septic tanks to develop community emptying schemes and share tips about how to best manage private sewerage systems
  • United Utilities is working with food outlets and restaurants in and around Windermere with tips to avoid constricting sewers with fatty waste which can lead to sewage spilling into the environment.
  • South Cumbria Rivers Trust and the Environment Agency are trialling innovative technology that if successful could be used to remove nutrients from septic tank effluent at a relatively low cost.
  • The Environment Agency will take samples and monitor water quality at four bathing water locations on Windermere until the end of the bathing water season in September, while farm inspections across the catchment will continue to focus on reducing diffuse pollution.

The work to improve Windermere will be a long-term challenge, and there is still much to learn about the complex issues affecting the lake.

However, it is hoped that the collaborative approach demonstrated through Love Windermere could set out a blueprint for improving the health of rivers and lakes across the UK.

Help us understand Forest Futures impact

The Lake District Foundation is looking for a consultant to evaluate the impact of our Forest Futures project. 

Working in partnership with Cumbria Woodlands, we were awarded funding to continue and develop the restoration of ecologically important woodlands in the Thirlmere Valley, Cumbria.

Funding came from The Green Recovery Challenge Fund and is being delivered over 18 months (ending in March 2023).

Forest Futures is restoring woodlands and growing skills. The project carries out vital restoration work on the ground at Thirlmere and provides advice on woodland creation and management to landowners / managers.

It also encourages and develops Graduate Foresters to take their first steps on their career pathway and to help deliver the Government’s bold targets around woodland creation. 

An independent evaluation of Forest Futures is needed to assess its initial impact, effectiveness of achieving intended goals, identify elements of best practice and highlight areas of challenge.

How to tender for Evaluation Report

The Tender brief is here. 

Deadline for Tender responses is 22 July 2022.

Funding secured to care for Windermere

The Lake District Foundation is delighted to have been awarded £73,000 for a long-term project to look after Windermere.

The funding has come from the Environment Agency’s Natural Environment Investment Readiness Fund and will help to develop sustainable funding mechanisms to care for this special place.

Stretching 10.5 miles, Windermere is a gem of the Lake District.

It is under environmental pressure with pollution from a range of sources leading to increasing phosphorus levels and important habitats at risk of being lost or degraded.

The Lake District Foundation’s work will continue to arrest this decline and move to restore habitats under threat.

The Foundation will work with Windermere Stakeholder Forum partners including the Environment Agency and the Lake District National Park Authority, land managers and launch a community septic tank emptying scheme to improve water quality.

The project will also look to develop its own visitor-giving model which brings together large and small investors to help support the Windermere project long-term, to the benefit of nature, the economy and the community.

Sarah Swindley, Chief Executive Lake District Foundation, said: “We are delighted to receive this funding to help secure the future of Windermere.

“In partnership, we can build on the great work already started and ensure we have a long-term and sustainable approach to care for this beautiful and special place in our most-loved National Park.

“At the Lake District Foundation, we always work to find points of balance between nature, heritage, and our Cumbrian economy.

“We believe that by working respectfully together with all those who live in, work or visit the area, we can find the solutions. We will reveal more details of these exciting and much needed plans shortly.”

Help us understand carbon scheme impact

A major £2.3m project to cut carbon in the Lake District is looking for a consultant to assess its impact.

The Low Carbon Lake District Fund is a comprehensive programme to help tackle climate change working in partnership with local businesses and communities.

Delivered by The Lake District Foundation, the Fund is led by the Lake District National Park Authority, other key partners include the National Trust, South Lakeland District Council and Cumbria Tourism.

The 47 projects funded so far include solar PV, air source heat pumps, insulation, LED lighting and energy management systems.

Embleton Spa Hotel (pictured above) received a food composter which is reducing waste going to landfill.

Rookhow Quaker Meeting House – a 300-year-old community facility in the Lyth Valley benefitted from an air source heat pump as part of its redevelopment and re-opening (pictured below).

The Low Carbon Lake District Fund opened for applications in April 2021 and will be completed by March 2023.

At the half-way point the Lake District Foundation seeks a consultant for an Evaluation Report.

The report would help us understand the impact of the project, identify areas for improvement, and articulate key outcomes that may be useful for further projects.

How to tender for Evaluation Report

The tender brief is here.

Find out more about the Low Carbon Lake District Fund

Deadline for Tender responses is 16 June.

Let’s love lake Windermere

A week-long fundraiser to help care for Windermere is launched today (Friday 22 April).

The Lake District Foundation is taking part in the Big Give’s Green Match Fund – a nationwide fundraising drive which launches on Earth Day and runs until 29 April.

The Big Give raises money for environmental campaigns across the country which tackle climate change, protect species, eliminate waste and improve sustainability.

In Cumbria the Lake District Foundation wants to raise funds to deliver a range of community activities which care for Windermere. Donations will be match-funded to the tune of £10k.

Windermere is England’s largest lake. It is a nationally important place for wildlife and is also a valued space for recreation, relaxation and well-being attracting thousands of visitors each year.

Sarah Swindley, Chief Executive Lake District Foundation said: “We are delighted to take part in this week-long fundraising push. All donations during the Big Give will be doubled so it’s a fantastic opportunity to raise significant funds.

“Windermere is a much-loved and iconic part of the Lake District. We want to raise as much as we can during this week of activity and then distribute monies to community projects which look after and enhance this beautiful place.”

People can support the Big Give from 22-29 April.

The donation link goes live from noon on 22 April.

“We are morally bound to preserve this way of life”

The Lake District Foundation has joined forces with The Lakes Distillery to launch a £25k funding pot for projects that enhance and conserve water quality.

The Lakes Distillery Water Fund is designed to support community and volunteer-led groups in their efforts to deliver water quality projects.

As the deadline for applications fast approaches (21 March 2022) we speak to Lakes Distillery co-founder and CEO Nigel Mills about the fund and why his company is so passionate about water quality…

Nigel Mills

How excited are you to launch The Lakes Distillery Water fund?

We are delighted to work with the Lake District Foundation on a fund which is designed to improve water quality in this wonderful part of the world.

We are really looking forward to receiving applications from community groups who have a passion for improving water quality throughout the Lake District National Park.

Why was The Lakes Distillery so keen to launch the Water Fund?

As a business nestled on the shore of Bassenthwaite Lake, our sense of responsibility is long-standing, but we didn’t think that trying to do good within the distillery alone was nearly enough.

We believe that the smartest way to drive positive change is by coming together and working in partnership where there is a common goal.

That is why we have joined forces with The Lake District Foundation to launch a collaboration we hope will have an impact for years to come. And we are excited to be able to support the fantastic work Sarah and the team at The Foundation do to protect and care for our National Park.

Why is The Lake Distillery so passionate about water quality?

All distilleries have a creation story, that moment of inspiration when someone decides they need to make whisky.

When that happens, there are three fundamental things they will need to succeed: lots of cold, clean water, space for storing whisky casks, and easy access to the market.

The Lake District has all of these in abundance and provides a beautiful and serene environment where creativity can flourish.

With our home rooted here, we are not only passionate about helping to protect it, but are morally bound to do all we can to preserve this way of life, including the quality of our rivers and lakes.

What kinds of water projects would you like to support?

We are in the early stages of this process in that we have asked for applications and are still waiting to see the requests. The most apparent thing for us is that we want to see projects driven by a desire to improve the water quality of our lakes and rivers.

How creative people are with the brief is up to them. We are set to look at applications at the end of March and can’t wait to see what great ideas the people of Cumbria come up with.

And your staff will also be getting involved?

The Lakes Distillery Water Fund has been made possible by the fundraising efforts of people from all areas of our business. The commitment is already company-wide, and I know the team are delighted that they are going to get the chance to be involved in supporting the successful projects first-hand.

We want to encourage positive change and so it goes beyond simply offering financial support to water improvement projects; we also want to play an active role in delivering them.

That is why each one of our team has been granted the opportunity to donate some of their time to support community and volunteer-led groups in their efforts to deliver these water quality schemes.

What would you say to community groups considering applying?

If you are considering applying for the Water Fund, we’d recommend you get moving with your application as the deadline of 21 March is fast approaching and we can’t wait to try and help you.

Apply here:

Lakes Distillery Water Fund must be received by 5pm Monday 22 March.

“Woodlands should be treasured by all” – meet graduate forester Bryce

Cumbria has a new kid on the block taking his first steps in forestry employment.

Bryce Flannaghan is a new graduate forester employed by the Lake District Foundation and managed by Cumbria Woodlands.

As part of his learning Bryce will work alongside United Utilities staff making lasting improvements to woodlands in Thirlmere. We caught-up with Bryce to find out more.

Bryce at Thirlmere. Photo Ewen Turner/Cumbria Woodlands.

Tell us about your role 

My role was created as part of a partnership between Cumbria Woodlands, United Utilities and the Lake District Foundation, who secured Green Recovery Challenge Funding generously provided by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

This will finance the restoration of plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites (PAWS) to their former natural condition throughout Thirlmere Valley. This will increase overall biodiversity, mitigate the effects of extreme weather events and climate change, as well as improving the water quality of Thirlmere reservoir, which supplies water throughout the Northwest.

My responsibility is the planning and implementation of this woodland restoration and I hope to improve and protect these unique habitats so future generations can benefit from them.

Thirlmere. Photo Ewen Turner / Cumbria Woodlands.

How pleased are you to start as graduate forester?

The forest industry is full of passionate and knowledgeable individuals, which makes for very strong competition when seeking employment as a graduate with little experience.

There are few apprenticeship schemes or graduate places that will allow someone who is new to the industry to develop their skills and connect with professionals and I was very lucky to have secured one with Cumbria Woodlands.

They, in partnership with United Utilities and the Lake District Foundation have supported me in my transition from education to full-time work, providing essential equipment and offering many training opportunities. I couldn’t ask for a better start in forestry.

Are woodlands a passion of yours?

At first, no. I finished my A-Levels and had no Idea what I wanted to do for a career, but I knew I wanted to work outdoors. I decided to do a forestry management course at the University of Cumbria on a whim and instantly loved it. I had never really thought about the importance of woodlands beyond their production of oxygen and as a place to go for a walk.

Seeing the vast scope of industry reliant on forest products and learning how sustainable forest management benefits the wider environment and the health and well-being of society, made me realise that woodlands should be treasured and protected by all.

What are you most looking forward to in your role?

Forestry and its related sectors comprise a wide range of disciplines and everyone I have met so far has had a wealth of knowledge and experience, and a passion for their respective fields.

I always learn something new when talking to colleagues or meeting woodland owners / managers on site. This, in combination with the many training and learning opportunities provided by Cumbria Woodlands, mean I can look forward to expanding my knowledge and experience while in this role and hopefully this will continue throughout my career.

Have you always lived in the Lake District?

I’m originally from the North East but after moving to the Lake District for university I couldn’t leave…

There’s a reason so many people visit the national park each year, the landscape is stunning and there’s no end of things to do if you enjoy being outdoors. I’m very fortunate to be able to live and work here.

What is your favourite place in the Lake District?

As a forester, you would probably think it would be a pristine woodland somewhere or the location of a remarkable ancient tree, but I prefer a challenging hike up a fell.

My favourite area at the moment is the Langdale Pikes and If I’m feeling brave, I’ll scramble up Jacks Rake along the way. I should also mention my favourite woodland though, which is Heald Wood, a National Trust site on the west shore of Windermere with a nice mixture of ancient broad-leaved woodland, large conifers and excellent views across the lake.

What are your passions outside of work?

Outside of work I enjoy climbing, hiking, and wild camping… and pretty much anything else you can do outdoors in the lakes. I also play the drums whenever I get the chance which, to the delight of my next door neighbours, isn’t too often.

Photo Ewen Turner / Cumbria Woodlands

COMMUNITY FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN SUCCESS

FOR KESWICK TO THRELKELD RAILWAY TRAIL

The Lake District Foundation, the local conservation charity, are celebrating after the recent opening of the much-loved Keswick to Threlkeld Railway Trail has proven a hit.

The trail reopened due to a successful six-month (K2T) community fundraising campaign in 2018 to help reinstate the path. 

The 10km return route from Keswick to Threlkeld has been well used over the Christmas and New Year break, welcoming runners, cyclists, walkers and multi-users . 

The reopening was made possible by the donations received during the campaign from individuals, local business and support from Highways England, the European Structural and Investment Funds and the Local Enterprise Partnership, the new, accessible route is opened on Saturday 5th December 2020, it was on the 5th anniversary of Storm Desmond.    

Following the floods in December 2015, the Keswick to Threlkeld Railway path suffered serious damage. Two of the old railway bridges that crossed the River Greta and around 200 metres of the path surface were washed away, and Rawsome Bridge was left at risk of collapse. 

Sarah Swindley, the Lake District Foundation’s CEO, said:The community fundraising campaign raised an incredible £130,000. We were thrilled to have had so much support from the local community, businesses, residents, visitors and organisations; everyone played their part to make it happen. We would like to say a huge thank-you to everyone who donated during the campaign. We are looking forward to the opening this Saturday and for everyone to enjoy the new path for years to come.” 

Local businesses boosted the fundraising campaign considerably including a generous donation from HF Holidays. One of their country houses, Derwent Bank, is situated close to the path where several walking routes from the house were are affected by the damage caused by Storm Desmond. HF Holidays donated £20,000 to the campaign. 

Hannah Garcia, HF Holidays, said: “HF Holidays was delighted to be able to contribute the £20,000 donation from the HF Pathways Fund to the Keswick to Threlkeld Railway Path Restoration, and be able to support the valuable work that has taken place; enabling our guests and walking community to continue to enjoy the fantastic routes and experiences this location offers.”   

The fundraising campaign saw donation boxes and promotional materials displayed in 72 local businesses and many of these carried out additional fundraising events including quiz nights, selling special products, and taking part in the K2T 5k challenge. 

Community organisations also got involved, making donations and holding events, including a railway path walk by Braithwaite School which raised over £300 and a national fell running event hosted by Keswick Athletic Club which raised £1,250. On midsummers day, with the support of Keswick Scouts, Keswick Anglers, Keswick Lions, Keswick Town Council and the Love the Lakes shop, a duck race raised a further £1,300 for the campaign. 

As part of the campaign, The Lake District Foundation hosted its first ever charity auction night and raised over £8,600 from 40 lots. Local businesses and celebrities donated fantastic prizes including a day on the Lake District Fells with Alan Hinkes OBE. The Lodore Falls Hotel & Spa kindly donated the venue, canapes, reception drinks and £20 per booking to the campaign. 

Members of the public donated online, by cash, cheque, or Text Giving throughout the campaign and 6 local residents set up sponsored events of their own. Adam Bazire, owner of the Threlkeld Coffee Shop, has raised over £2,300 to date on his challenge to walk the full route of the old railway from Penrith station to the former Keswick station. 

For further information about the trail visit the Lake District National Park website http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk  

LAKE DISTRICT HEDGEROW CAMPAIGN SET TO DOUBLE DONATIONS

The Lake District Foundation, the local conservation charity, is spearheading a fundraising campaign to reinstate and conserve native hedgerows. The charity is participating in The Big Give Christmas Challenge, a match funding initiative enabling donations to be doubled for one week in December. 

The Christmas Challenge launched by the founder of The Big Give, philanthropist Sir Alec Reed CBE in 2008, is the biggest match funding campaign in the UK. It offers supporters of participating charities, like the Lake District Foundation, the opportunity to have their donation doubled for seven days from 1st – 8th December 2020. 

Sarah Swindley, Lake District Foundation’s, CEO said, “We need to raise £7,000 to unlock the match funding available in the Big Give Christmas Challenge for the Lake District Foundation. The fact that any donation made will be doubled during this week is incredible, so we do hope everyone can dig deep and donate. A small donation will make a huge difference, thank you!” 

The Real Hedge Fund campaign aims to highlight the importance of hedgerows in the environment and the role within the cultural and natural heritage of the Lake District. The campaign has an ambitious target to plant 4,000 metres of native hedgerows across the Lake District and aims to raise £100,000 to make this happen. 

The Lake District Foundation launched the campaign in June 2020 in partnership with Ullswater Catchment Management CIC, Food, Farming and Countryside Commission, Cumbria Wildlife Trust, Woodland Trust and Eden Rivers Trust. 

The Christmas Challenge 2020 will take place from 12pm on 1st December 2020 until 12pm on 8th December 2020, to make a donation visit : https://donate.thebiggive.org.uk/campaign/a051r00001exMK1AAM  and to find out more the Real Hedge Fund visit https://www.lakedistrictfoundation.org/the-real-hedge-fund/ 

VIRTUAL ADVENTURE EVENING LAUNCHED FOR FIX THE FELLS

The Lake District Foundation, has launched a virtual adventure evening to raise funds for Fix the Fells.   

The fundraiser is called ‘Why we adventure…’ hosted by Sean Conway, one of the charities’ Ambassadors and will be streamed on Thursday 10th December at 7.30pm. The virtual event will see exclusive videos from leading explorers, climbers, runners, cyclists, paddleboarders, kayakers and photographers delving into why they adventure and a series of special Q&A’s with each speaker, led by Sean Conway. 

Sean Conway, Ambassador, Lake District Foundation, said: “I’m proud to be an Ambassador for the Lake District Foundation and excited to host the adventure evening for Fix the Fells. The night is going to explore why we feel the need to still take on adventures, when practically every mountain has been climbed, ocean rowed, and desert crossed. The line-up is a great mix, from climbers, paddleboarders to photographers. Massive thank you to all of the speakers who are giving up their time for a good cause! It’s going to be a fun night; I hope you can join us.” 

The speakers have been to all corners of the world and each has a different perspective on why they adventure. The line-up includes Kenton Cool, Leo Holding, Mohammed Dhalech, Anna McNuff, Lizzie Carr, Simon Yates, Gwilym Pugh, James Forrest, Pip Stewart, Jamie MacDonald, Dave Cornthwaite and Kaite-Jane L’herpiniere. The event is a series of coordinated conversations recorded over the last couple of months. It therefore won’t be live, so the Lake District Foundation are encouraging those who book and have burning questions for any of the speakers to send them in now to [email protected]

In addition to the headline speakers, Richard Fox from Fix the Fells will also share an insight into what Fix the Fells do and why the Lake District Foundation is calling for your support.  

Richard Fox, Fix the Fells, said: “Fix the Fells raises funds to repair and maintain the extensive network of upland paths across the Lake District for the present and future generations to enjoy. The money raised from this event will support our volunteers, without whom we wouldn’t be able to carry out the work we do. So, enjoy the evening, donate £8 and you can help make a difference in our beautiful fells. Thank you!” 

The early bird ticket rate is £8 per household until 30th November then the price is £10. Tickets can be booked online and details of the speakers can be found at lakedistrictfoundation.org/why-we-adventure.  

New business supporter: The Lost Compass

We are delighted to announce a new partnership between the Lake District Foundation and The Lost Compass, a new UK based company, supplying 100% eco-friendly and sustainable apparel and clothing.

The Lost Compass is a family business, based in Cheshire, UK and is run by Jade and Jack and was founded in 2018. The Lost Compass aims to provide a clothing brand that is substantially less harmful to the environment; provides a Fairtrade and ethical product lifecycle; transforms the mind-set of clothing consumers towards carbon neutral alternatives and celebrates all that is fantastic about the UK’s countryside.

We are delighted that Jade and Jack have chosen to donate 5% of sales of their organic cotton Scafell and the Herdwick Sheep t-shirts to the Lake District Foundation, it is so exciting to be working with a company that considers the environment in every aspect of their productions and sales.

In addition to their environmental credentials, all of the printing and embroidery is completed in the UK, thus supporting British businesses.

Jade says “We want to be able to give something back to a country that has provided us with so many fond memories. Therefore being able to donate some of our profits to our National Parks, fulfils our ambition to help sustain this beautiful country we call home.

For us at The Lost Compass it is very simple… Explore our World, Sustain our Home and Enjoy Every Minute.”

To read more about their story and to purchase their fantastic products, visit www.thelostcompassltd.co.uk

And if you would like to find out more about supporting the Lake District Foundation in your business, and to read about the impact of donations, take a look here or get in touch.

 

Orrest Head Fundraising Campaign Raises £38,000

A local conservation charity, the Lake District Foundation and the Lake District National Park are celebrating raising over £38,000 for the Orrest Head accessibility improvement project. 

The fundraising campaign launched last autumn aims is create an alternative path to the summit of Orrest Head making it suitable for people with limited mobility, including people with powered-wheelchairs and families with pushchairs to see this spectacular viewpoint. 

Donations for the project have been building over the last year but this week the fundraising campaign was successful in securing £5,000 from the TransPennine Express Transform Grants Fund: a community fund supporting projects that tackle youth unemployment, promote social inclusion and improve the environment. 

Steve Tonkin, Lake District Foundation, said: “We are over the moon with this award from the Transform Grants Fund. It’s helped reach over £38,000 mark! We have an ambitious target of raising £50,000 in total but know with the support and generous donations from visitors and locals we can do it. You can make a donation today on our website, lakedistrictfoundation.org.” 

The Lake District Foundation is working alongside the Lake District National Park, Windermere Town Council and South Lakeland District Council to drive this fundraising campaign forward. The plan is to restore a section of Victorian carriage drive and create an accessible path to the viewpoint, improve the water drainage and restore the eroded summit landscape, replace the worn-out seating, provide more information about the area and the view. The project also hopes to provide an all-terrain Lake District Mobility scooter for people to borrow to get to the viewpoint.

Marian Jones, Area Ranger, Lake District National Park said: “Covid 19 has had an impact on our project plans so we are now aiming to complete the project by December 2021, but this depends having the necessary funding in place. This project aims to help more people enjoy and appreciate the view from Orrest Head by creating improved, sustainable access to the summit. It is a project about people – removing barriers, providing opportunity, increasing understanding and building relationships. Thank you for your support.” 

You can make a donation on the Lake District Foundation website by visiting lakedistrictfoundation.org.

Cumbria Hedgerow Campaign Receives Donation Boost

A fundraising campaign aiming to raise £100,000 to create and reinstate 4,000 metres of native hedgerows in the Lake District has received a generous boost from the Woodland Trust. 
 
The Lake District Foundation, Ullswater Catchment Management CIC, Food, Farming and Countryside Commission, Cumbria Wildlife Trust and Eden Rivers Trust launched the Real Hedge Fund in June 2020. The campaign aims to highlight the importance of hedgerows in the environment, the role within the cultural and natural heritage of the Lake District and to replant native hedgerows where these have been removed. 
 

The Real Hedge Fund campaign has had a fantastic start with 180 metres of new native hedges donated by the Woodland Trust, which equates to a financial donation of £4,500.  
 

Sarah Swindley, Lake District Foundation’s, CEO said, “We’ve hit the ground running thanks to the Woodland Trust. A huge thank-you to them for leading the way with a superb donation. We have an ambitious plan to plant 4,000 metres of native hedgerow, which costs around £25 per metre to manage and plant across Cumbria and we need your help. We want you to see nature as the best investment with the highest return!”  
 

The local conservation charity, Lake District Foundation, is encouraging everyone to get involved by making a donation from £25 per metre. All information can be found at lakedistrictfoundation.org.  
 

Julia Aglionby, University of Cumbria’s Professor in Practice, said: Since the second world war we have lost over half our hedges, that is over 250,000 miles of hedges and many that are remaining are in poor condition. Hedges are great, they provide food for birds and insects, they are refuges for wildflowers and contain multiple species of trees and shrubs. As importantly they reduce flooding by slowing run off, store carbon and act as corridors for wildlife across more intensively managed farmland. From a farming perspective they are good too, providing sheltered boundaries which as a farmer I know are invaluable in stormy weather.  The Real Hedge Fund campaign is an opportunity to make a difference and raise vital awareness, so we hope you get involved and support us. Thank-you.” 
 
The charity will also be running a larger crowdfunding appeal later in the year through the national Big Give platform. It is the leading online match funder which brings charities, philanthropists and the public together to multiply their impact. The crowdfunding appeal will support the Real Hedge Fund campaign, the charity is looking for a small number of donors to help them kick start this appeal from businesses to individuals.  If you would be interested in getting involved, get in touch with the Lake District Foundation either by email, [email protected] or telephone 01539 822622. 

To make a donation to the Real Hedge Fund and for further information visit https://www.lakedistrictfoundation.org/the-real-hedge-fund/
 

We’ve hit the ground running thanks to the Woodland Trust. A huge thank-you to them for leading the way with a superb donation.

Sarah Swindley, Lake District Foundation’s, CEO

How Covid has impacted on our thinking about the natural world

During May and June, we ran a short survey to find out more about people’s views and concerns about our natural world, and the role that access to natural spaces had played during the corona virus pandemic.  Nearly 230 people responded to our survey, and we will be using the findings to help shape and inform our future programmes of work. 

Who Responded? 

Most respondents were over 25, so we know we need to do some further work to capture the view and insights of young people. 

Nearly everyone who replied had some access to green or natural spaces during this time, though we know that this isn’t the case for everyone. 

Most respondents were from Cumbria and Lancashire and we can assume that most respondents already had an interest in protecting and conserving the environment, with 67% reporting that green and natural spaces were just as important to them now as they had always been. 

Key Findings

  • Most people (66%) reported discovering new spaces, footpaths and routes near to where they lived.   
  • Footpaths and rights of way and woodlands were the most visited spaces, followed by streets and local parks, and over half of people said that they will continue to access green and natural spaces more local to them once restrictions are lifted.  “I have decided that I want to spend more time in nature locally and cut my driving and travel.” 
  • People reported a range of positive benefits from having access to natural spaces during ‘lock down’ and restrictions, with 75% reporting positive benefits to their mental health, and 62% reporting benefits to their physical health.  64% of people also reported that access to natural space provided an activity at a time when other options for recreation were limited.
  • However, a smaller number of people recorded negative impacts, in particular reporting concerns around maintaining social distancing and feeling confident to access spaces safely when other people are around, especially following an increase in the number of people accessing green spaces that they might normally use.
  • Nearly everyone reported seeing some positive changes in the nature and wildlife around them, recording increases in birdsong, wildlife and insects, with 35% of people reported that they now wanted to do more to help conserve the natural world. 
  • All respondents placed great value on being able to access green and natural spaces, with 67% saying that they are just as important as they were before, and 33% reporting that they were now even more important to them. 
  • We can see that the benefit people have gained from our natural spaces has positively  influenced their interest in supporting charities working to protect these spaces.  Half of respondents already donated to causes which support the natural world and environment, and 12% said that they now might give more in the future.  Nearly 1/3rd reported that they had not given to support the natural world before but might now in the future. 
  • We’ve also seen an increases in the volume of people willing to donate through outdoor contactless points, with just over 50% of respondents reported that they would be likely to donate in this way, compared to 31% when we surveyed people in this issues in 2018 survey.  

Emerging Themes  

Several broader themes also emerged from the survey, and which we will be working to explore further. 

  • Health and Wellbeing – Our survey highlighted the vital role that access to green and natural spaces plays in supporting health and wellbeing, and in particular mental health and emotional wellbeing. 
  • Managing visitors to the area – People identified the challenges in managing access to green and natural spaces, and balancing the needs of both residents and visitors.
  • Equality of access– People recognised that not everyone had equal access to green and natural spaces and were keen to explore how this could best be tackled.  
  • Transport and Parking – Restrictions on travel highlighted the hugely positive impact of reduced traffic in and around our natural spaces.  People were keen to explore how we could build on this and improve infrastructure for other forms of more environmentally friendly travel to and around our green spaces – including cycling and improved public transport. 
  • Behaving Responsibly People’s reported concerns about a perceived lack of knowledge or education around how to safely and considerately access the countryside and natural spaces.  Many people reported that they thought people were  now less familiar with the Countryside Code. 
  • Learning from the crisis to improve the management of our natural spaces – People wanted the wider response to current crisis to have nature at its heart.  They highlighted positive consequences of restrictions which could be captured and used to inform future developments in the management of green / natural spaces. For example, looking at the impact of reduced traffic and footfall across the Lake District National Park and exploring what this has shown us and what could be taken forward in the future. 
  • Biodiversity loss – People expressed broad concerns regarding biodiversity loss, in our natural spaces, and suggested how changes in land, environmental and farming management practices could be used to tackle this.  

Survey quotes

I feel it’s become apparent that natural and green spaces are imperative to physical and mental well-being. However, it has also demonstrated the challenges that exist. How do we travel to these spaces? How do we interact with them? How do we balance the needs of those visiting vs the impact of those visits? We could have a unique opportunity to change the way we do things, but that change needs to start now.

I miss the Lakes!! Cannot wait to be able to come back and enjoy the mountains again with my family. Outdoor spaces, particularly the lakes, is hugely important to my mental health – it is where I feel most comfortable and happy.

Home working and the restrictions have put a heavier reliance on accessing natural spaces for exercise and mental health, but have only strengthened my existing conviction of the need for a simple and close relationship with nature – and the desire to avoid unnecessary travel, particularly by car, and also technology when engaging with nature.

Access to green spaces has been vital for us as  key workers and with 3 children under 7 mental well being has been a top priority for us to maintain.

We should encourage more sustainable modes of transport.  The lack of traffic in the Lakes was profound in the early weeks of lockdown and enhanced my experience of the Lakes.

I’ve lived in the Lakes for 4 years and have never done as much outdoors as I have done during lockdown. Not having access really made me appreciate it. Only been able to access what was on my doorstep made me appreciate where I live. I was furloughed; I’m worried about what it will be like going back to work. I was always so tired! With the long days and commuting. I’m worried I will lose the joy I’ve had from being outdoors because of lack of time.

Cedar Manor is open for business and Covid ready

The Foundation works with over 150 business supporters who either fundraise for the charity or make a donation. The businesses have been busy preparing to re-open safely at the start of July following Visit Britain guidelines.  

The Cedar Manor Hotel in Windermere has been a business supporter since 2007 raising over £17,000 for the Foundation during that period. They re-opened their doors at the start of July after receiving their ‘Good to Go’ accreditation from Visit Britain.   

Jonathan Kaye, Owner of The Cedar Manor Hotel, explains,  

“We have gone through quite an extensive program to get Covid-19 safe. We have received our accreditation from Visit Britain, the Good to Go Kitemark, in July and have now opened our doors. 

To get this we have completed 3 key risk assessments that are all focussed on Covid-19.

First a customer journey, from booking to departing, to ensure they will feel confident and safe at all times.

Second, the staff journey, whether chef, housekeeper, front of house or manager, to ensure they are aware of the new standards and rules and can complete their tasks in a safe environment.

Third, the building. We have been working to make this covid safe by the using an external contractor who will use an environmentally friendly chemical to “Fog” all our rooms and public areas (including the terrace) which puts an invisible coating over all surfaces, even fabrics that lasts 28 days.

We have purchased PPE for staff and training plans have been implemented. We have implemented digital signage in place with sanitizing stations at the entrance and entrances to public areas. Our room folders have been replaced with an APP and Hotel TV channels added for those who don’t use a smartphone, with all you need to know about the hotel.

We have sent emails to guests booking with revised information, pre-arrival emails with detailed information regarding to arrival at the hotel and the option to pay online prior to departure, making it a contactless experience. Also, not forgetting with added our Covid Guest Charter on our website too.

Above all, we are reassuring guests that although it sounds like a “new world”, we want them to come and relax knowing that its safe and they are going to be well looked after.”

Why we support the Lake District Foundation?

“Initially, we joined in 2007 shortly after taking over Cedar Manor. We were introduced to the foundation and understood quickly that a few pounds from each guest would do great work for local charities. What struck a cord for us was the Park being a place to come for free and asking the guests for £2 to help keep the footpaths maintained, preserve red squirrels and do other great work was a no-brainer.

We then looked at our “green” journey and visitor giving is part of gaining green accolades, so as we were already embarked on this process, it was a big tick for us. The guests really don’t mind and love the fact that they can contribute to the well-being of the park.”

What struck a cord for us was the Park being a place to come for free and asking the guests for £2 to help keep the footpaths maintained, preserve red squirrels and do other great work was a no-brainer.

Jonathan Kaye, oWNER
cEDAR MANOR
Cedar Manor Hotel 
Jonathan and Caroline Kaye 
cedarmanor.co.uk 

 

Welcome back

The Lake District is now welcoming back visitors. We are delighted you have continued to support and value this special place. 

Whilst you have been away, we have worked alongside partners and businesses to look after our natural world. We hope you enjoy exploring the open spaces and your favourite spots in this spectacular landscape. For guidance on visiting safely, please visit the Lake District National Park website.   

We rely on your support to help to care for the wildlife, landscapes and cultural heritage of the Lake District and Cumbria.  

Find out more about the many ways that you can make a difference today here

Lake District Foundation launches new visitor giving scheme

lake district national park bridge

The Lake District Foundation has launched a new visitor giving initiative to help protect and care for the Lake District National Park.

The Lake District Foundation is encouraging visitors and locals to make a donation to help look after this spectacular place for now and in the future, by offering the opportunity to sponsor a place, project or person – or by making a one-off donation.

This type of donation and fundraising activity was run by the Lake District National Park but will now be carried by the Lake District Foundation on their behalf.

lake district national park gate

Richard Leafe, Lake District National Park, Chief Executive, said: “We are delighted to be working with the Lake District Foundation to carry out this unique way of raising funds to help look after our paths, gates and fingerposts. This charity is suitably placed to take on this activity, they are part of the Lake District National Park Partnership and they raise funds for conservation, environmental and cultural heritage projects across the Lake District. The money which is raised via this scheme will allow for more people to enjoy exploring the Lake District National Park now and in years to come.”

The Lake District National Park maintains more than 3,100km of footpaths and bridleways. The impact of over 19 million visitors each year, combined with the Cumbrian climate, means the National Park are constantly carrying out improvements and maintenance.

lake district national park fingerpost

Sarah Swindley, Lake District Foundation’s CEO, said: “We are excited to be working in partnership with the Lake District National Park to present this visitor giving opportunity.  Giving people the choice to sponsor a place, project or person, through the National Parks work programme, allows individuals to leave a lasting memory in a World Heritage site in celebration or in remembrance of a loved one. We have created a new easy-to-use donation section on our website to allow people to select what, where or who they’d like to sponsor. We welcome all donations and thank everyone in advance for their support.”

Those who are interesting in making a donation have a number of different choices:

  • Sponsor specific items – you can view the available items in a particular area via an interactive map and select the item you wish to sponsor. These items include gates, fingerposts and bridges starting from £250 to £1,000+. All have the opportunity to add a personalised plaque
  • Sponsor any item – you may simply wish to make a donation for any gate, fingerpost or bridge with a personalised plaque but don’t have a preference of where in the Lake District.
  • Sponsor a Park Ranger – the Lake District National Park Rangers work to maintain and improve access, protect wildlife and support local communities, farmers and visitors. It’s a rewarding job but help is required to fund the work on the ground, from £15+.
  • Sponsor an Apprentice – the Lake District National Park have a 100% success rate for apprentices moving into employment after training. Sponsoring an apprentice could help fund their training and equipment from £10 for a new pair of hard-wearing work gloves.
  • Make a donation – our mountains take you to new heights in the Lake District. You can help keep them that way. A small donation makes a big difference, for example £5 could pay for a native tree sapling, £10 could help repair a metre of footpath and £25 pays towards a metre of dry stone wall.

To donate any amount, visit the Lake District Foundation website at https://www.lakedistrictfoundation.org/sponsor-the-lake-district-national-park/

Ullswater Way crowdfunder receives donation boost

A crowdfunding campaign to raise £5,000 for repairs on the popular walking route in the Lake District, the Ullswater Way, has received a welcome donation boost helping the campaign reach the halfway point of meeting its target.

The £1,000 donation came from Ambleside Park Hotel, an exclusive staff only John Lewis Partnership hotel located in Ambleside, overlooking Windermere.

Ambleside Park Hotel has been raising funds for the Lake District Foundation since 2017 donating nearly £9,000 to date through visitor giving from guests.

Andrew Craig-Mair, Partner and Hotel Manager, Ambleside Park, said: “We are delighted to support the crowdfunding campaign for the Ullswater Way footpath repair. We would like to thank all our guests who have made this £1,000 donation possible. There are various ways a business can fundraise for the Lake District Foundation and we hope this £1,000 donation will encourage further visitor giving for the campaign and help towards hitting the final target of £5,000.”

The money raised through this crowdfunding appeal will allow work to be carried out by the Lake District National Park ranger team and volunteers to reduce the impact of the busy summer season ahead. The route needs drainage works, improvements to the path surface, new drystone walling, waymarker signs and to ensure the path is litter-free.

Sarah Swindley, Lake District Foundation’s CEO, said: “We are delighted to receive such a boost to the crowdfunder campaign bringing the current total to £2,988 but still have some way to go with only two weeks left to donate. If you love the Ullswater Way and the Lake District, we urge you to make a donation if you can, as a small donation makes a big difference.”

In return for donations on the crowdfunding campaign, rewards will be sent to those people who donate specific amounts. The rewards include:
Donate £10, receive a Ullswater Way Pin Badge, 20 available.
Donate £25, receive a Conquer Lake District unisex Cumbria Livin’ T-shirt, 20 available.
Donate £50, receive a Columbia Rucksack Urban Lifestyle 25L Daypack – an outdoor-inspired construction and minimalist, city look combine in this versatile commuter backpack, 10 available.
Donate £200, spend a day out with a Lake District National Park ranger repairing the Ullswater Way.

The crowdfunding campaign is running until Monday 27th May at 9pm. To donate any amount, visit the Ullswater Way project page on the crowdfunding website at www.crowdfunder.co.uk/ullswaterway .

Crowdfunding campaign for Langdale Pikes extended

A crowdfunding campaign to raise £5,000 for repairs to popular walking route in the Langdale Pikes is well-past the halfway point of meeting its target; and the deadline has been extended as support continues to grow.

Earlier this month, The Lake District Foundation launched its latest crowd funder to raise money to fund vital repairs along the path from Stake Pass to Pike O’Stickle via Martcrag Moor, making special rewards available for generous donors.

The cash raised will be donated to Fix the Fells, enabling its volunteers to landscape erosion scars, improve drainage, and define the line of the path to avoid a fragile bog habitat.

Volunteers will also build new sections of the ‘sheep fleece path’ – a traditional type of path that involves ‘floating’ a gravel path over peat bog by using the fleece as a barrier between the ground and the path.

This approach, which is both sustainable and environmentally friendly, results in an excellent upland path that blends in effectively with its surroundings.

James Forrest, Fix the Fells Fundraiser, says, “We’ve really seen a jump in the number of people pledging their support for this project in the last few days, especially from Ambleside Park one of our business fundraisers. We’re well on the way to raising £3,000 at the moment, but we’d love to hit £5,000. We’ve now extended the deadline to February 10 after seeing supporters really pick up the pace.”

In return for donations, rewards will be sent to those people who donate the following specific amounts.

The rewards include:

• A Fix the Fells pin badge for donations of £10 or more

• A Lake District Foundation goodie bag (containing a tote bag, Conquer the Lake District patch, badge and pen) for donations of £20 or more

• A limited edition Fix the Fells t-shirt in a size of your choice – designed by Fix the Fells partner Geo Clothing (https://geoclothing.co.uk/) – for donations of £40 or more

• A day out with the Fix the Fells volunteers on a ‘drain run’ for donations of £100 or more

• A hike with local adventurer and author James Forrest (aka ‘Mountain Man’) for a donation of £200 or more

To donate any amount, visit the Langdales project page on the crowdfunding website at www.crowdfunder.co.uk/martcragmoor before February 10.

Crowdfunding campaign launched for Langdale Pikes

A new crowdfunding campaign has been launched to raise money for a popular walking route in the Langdale Pikes.

The Lake District Foundation aims to raise £5,000 by the end of January to fund vital repairs to the path from Stake Pass to Pike O’Stickle via Martcrag Moor.

The cash raised will be donated to Fix the Fells, enabling its volunteers to landscape erosion scars, improve drainage, and define the line of the path to avoid a fragile bog habitat.

Volunteers will also build new sections of the ‘sheep fleece path’ – a traditional type of path that involves ‘floating’ a gravel path over peat bog by using the fleece as a barrier between the ground and the path.

This approach, which is both sustainable and environmentally friendly, results in an excellent upland path that blends in effectively with its surroundings.

James Forrest, Fix the Fells Fundraiser, said: “The jagged skyline of Langdale is one of Lakeland’s most beautiful sights – and the distinctive peaks of the Pikes are much-loved by walkers, runners, cyclists and tourists alike. But this popularity comes at a price.

“The Langdale Pikes are suffering from ongoing erosion caused by human activity. This is why the work of Fix the Fells’ dedicated teams of rangers and volunteers is of crucial importance. Please help support this vital conservation work. Every donation – no matter how big or small – makes a real difference.”

In return for donations, rewards will be sent to those people who donate specific amounts. The rewards include:

• A Fix the Fells pin badge for donations of £10 or more

• A Lake District Foundation goodie bag (containing a tote bag, Conquer the Lake District patch, badge and pen) for donations of £20 or more

• A limited edition Fix the Fells t-shirt – designed by Fix the Fells partner Geo Clothing (https://geoclothing.co.uk/) – for donations of £40 or more

• A day out with the Fix the Fells volunteers on a ‘drain run’ for donations of £100 or more

• A hike with local adventurer and author James Forrest (aka ‘Mountain Man’) for a donation of £200 or more

To donate any amount, visit the Langdales project page on the crowdfunding website at www.crowdfunder.co.uk/martcragmoor before January 29.

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